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19G4 AMML REPORT 

TOWN DF IPSWICH 

Massachusetts 



IPSWICH 

LEAGUE OF WOMEN 

VOTERS 

YOUR VOTERS SERVICE COMMITTEE 

presents statements of candidates for office requested in a 
questionnaire sent to them. The information is in the candidate s own 
words. 

Questions submitted to candidates were: 

1. Name, address, and age 

2. Education, training and experience that qualify you for this 
office 

3. Duties of this office which interest you most and your reasons 
for seeking this office (limited to 100 words) in the March 
8, 1965 town election. 

FOR ANOTHER LEAGUE SERVICE 
CALL 356-3236 

for Transportation to the Polls 
March 8, 1965 



UNCONTESTED 
CANDIDATES 

MODERATOR 

JOSEPH V. RILEY 

CLAM COMMISSIONER 

ARTHUR N. MOON 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

FRANK L. COLLINS 

PARK COMMISSIONER 

(3 years) 

RICHARD J. BURKE 

PARK COMMISSIONER 

FREDERICK S. 

JENKINS 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 

GORDON C. PLAYEP 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 

(1 year vacancy) 

RAYMOND S. 

BARROWS 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
STANLEY E. EUSTACE 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

CHARLES L. ROSE 



SELECTMEN 

TWO POSITIONS, 
3 YEAR TERMS 

EDWARD KOZENESKI 

Linebrook Rd., age 36 

Ipswich Public School system 
graduate; Former Ipswich School 
Committee member; Lifelong resi- 
dent of Ipswich. 

As a lifelong resident of Ipswich, 
with a keen interest in Town Gov- 
ernment, I offer my services to 
the people of Ipswich as a Select- 
man. I promise to carry out my 
duties as a Selectman in a sincere 
and energetic manner always 
bearing in mind the duties and 
obligations of this most important 
office. 

JOSEPH W. LINEHAN 

Topsfield Rd., age 58 

Moved to Ipswich in 1911. Att- 
ended local schools. My formal 
education because of the death 
of my father. My degrees are from 
the school of experience. 

For 32 years I have successfully 
conducted by own business. 

I believe Selectmen are trustees 
for the townspeople, and should 
conduct the public business as 
they would their private busi- 
nesses. This means selectmen 
have an obligation to assure pru- 
dent and economical operation 
within the means of already over- 
burdened taxpayers. 

In approving the expenditure of 



public funds, consideration should 
be given to the ability to pay of 
low income earners as well as of 
those who are financially well 
fixed. 

Membership in clubs, associa- 
tions, etc. is not any qualification 
for public office. Economy in 
government is the guarantee of 
efficiency of value received for 
each expenditure. The taxpayers 
have a right to know what goes on 
at all times. 

JOHN R. LOGAN 

9 Oakhurst Ave., age 42 

Maine Maritime Academy 1942; 
Boston College, B.S. 1950; Attend- 
ed Suffolk University Law School, 
1962; Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
Post No. 1093; Former Consultant, 
Central Intelligence agency; Pres- 
ent Chairman Ipswich Planning 
Board (1961- ); married, father 
of 8 children; homeowner. 

To me, the most important duty 
of a Selectman is the administra- 
tion of Town affairs according to 
sound business practices. The 
soaring tax rate and a confused, 
uncoordinated government de- 
mand a change to energetic, re- 
sponsible leadership. 

My years of experience on the 
Planning Board I believe con- 
tribute necessary knowledge and 
understanding to deal effectively 
with many of the vital cost factors 
confronting the Town. Such fact- 



ors as general population growth 
and its interrelationship with 
school needs and other Town 
services; water and sewerage 
programs; new road construction; 
general economic planning and 
growth. 

If elected I will bend my every 
effort including this understand- 
ing and experience to serve the 
balanced best interest of all the 
people. 

FRANCIS X. MASSE 

Riverside Drive, age 31 

Bachelor of science in physics 
and mathematics with under- 
graduate courses in government 
and business management. Pres- 
ently hold appointments as a 
physicist on the senior staff at 
M.I.T. and as a consultant medical 
physicist at Tufts. Also serving 
as a consultant in physics to in- 
dustry and to several of the major 
Boston hospitals. Nuclear inci- 
dent advisor to the Mass. Dept. 
of Public Health and the Mass. 
Dept. of Public Safety, Division 
of State Police. Member of the 
executive board of the New Eng- 
land Chapter of the international 
Health Physics Society. Certified 
by the American Board of Health 
Physics. Member of the Board of 
Directors and of the Finance 
Committee of the North Cam- 
bridge Co-operative Banks. Mem- 
ber for the past two years and 
present Chairman of the Town 
Government Study Committee. 
Chairman of the 1963 Town By- 
law Committee. 

I believe that the key to the 
orderly growth and stability of 
the town is held by the Board 
of Selectmen. The role of this 
board as Water and Light Com- 
missioners, Sewer Commissioners, 
Board of Public Works, as general 
watchguard over all matters 
affecting the interests or welfare 
of the town is an all-important 
role in the progress of the com- 
munity. The Town has contracted 
for costly comprehensive plans 
and surveys which prescribe solu- 
tions to the needs of the Town. 
The selectmen must now act on 
these plans without regard for 
political favoritism. With rising 
taxes and increased demands for 
town services, imagination and 
new thinking are essential in this 
office. 

JOHN A. PECHILIS 

Warner Rd., age 38 

Graduate of Ipswich High 
School. 

Graduate Gallup's Island Mari- 
time School with commission of 
Warrant Officer in World War n. 

Three year extension course in 
business with Alexander Hamil- 
ton Institute. 

Eight years as a Selectman of 



Ipswich — 1956, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 
63, 64. 

Three as Chairman of Board of 
Selectmen — 1960, 1963, 1964. 

Member of the Government 
Study Committee 1962. Member 
Sewer Construction Committee. 
Member Industrial Commission 
1956-57. Member Republican Com- 
mittee of Ipswich 1956-64. Presi- 
dent of the Ipswich Rotary Club 
1964-65. Member of the Ipswich 
Chamber of Commerce. Delegate 
to the Republican State Conven- 
tion. Ipswich businessman for 18 
years. General and Business 
Chairman of several financial 
drives for worthwhile causes. 

The office of Selectman is one 
which requires a great deal of 
time and an extensive knowledge 
of the workings of municipal, 
county and state governments. It 
also requires people who recog- 
nize the needs of the Town and 
who have an acquaintance with 
a large percentage of the popula- 
tion. 

Ie feel that my experience as 
a Selectman for eight years and 
eighteen years of serving the 
people of Ipswich in business 
gives me the background needed 
to deal with complexities of mod- 
ern municipal government and 
the particular problems of Ips- 
wich, 

My prime aim if elected, is to 
continue working for the better- 
ment and improvement of mu- 
nicipal services in the Town at 
the lowest possible cost. 



SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 

TWO POSITIONS 
3 YEAR TERMS 

GEORGE J. GEANAKOS 

Argilla Rd., age 37 

Attended local schools and Nor- 
wich University. 

Senior member of School Com- 
mittee (10 years). Chairman of 
School Committee (3 years). Past 
Chairman of Regional Planning 
Committee. Past Secretary of 
School Building Committee. 

I own and operate my own 
business. 

The School Committee is a 
policy making group which han- 
dles all the aspects of education. 

I also believe that every child 
no matter what his ability is 
entitled to the best possible 
education. 

ANNETTE I. (NAN) 
GEORGE 

(Mrs. William E.) 

11 Cedar View Rd., age 30 

Graduated from Providence 

Classical High School; Colby Col- 



lege, Waterville, Maine with an 
A.B. degree. 

Ipswich League of Women 
Voters, Town Committee on Pre- 
cinct Voting and Representative 
Town Meeting, Brownie Girl 
Scout Leader, President of Friend- 
ship House Corporation, Ipswich 
Women's Club. Member of Ips- 
wich Historical Society, Member 
of First and South Congregational 
Church. Parent of three daugh- 
ters. 

Our school system is basically 
a very good one, improving each 
year. 

There is, however, a lack of 
communication between the school 
committee and the tax-payer- 
parent on the one hand, and 
between the teachers and the 
school committee on the other 
hand. 

Educational needs and desires 
change every day in this complex 
world of ours. More communica- 
tion between groups would lead 
to an even better education for 
our children. 

If you elect me to your school 
committee, I will work for closer 
cooperation in this area. I feel 
my background, community activ- 
ities, and interest well qualify 
me for this position. 

JESSIE C. GIRARD 

Jeffrey's Neck Rd 

Born and raised in Ipswich, 
and have spent most of my adult 
life here. Graduated from Ipswich 
High School. Worked under Civil 
Service at Portsmouth Navy Yard. 
Active in Union and Labor Busi- 
ness. Attended night school in 
Boston last year. Presently em- 
ployed at Sylvania Plant in Ips- 
wich. Mother of four children. 
Taxpayer. 

Have always been greatly inter- 
ested in school affairs, and in 
providing the best possible educa- 
tion for all the children of our 
town. To my mind, this means 
good teachers, and adequate 
classrooms, leaving out the "frills" 
or non-essentials, which in them- 
selves, do not contribute to basic 
education. We must consider town 
growth, and the ever-growing need 
for the tools, or facilities, neces- 
sary for the requirements of a 
good education. Then we must 
strike a balance, making sure 
that we do not "bite off more 
than we can chew," and that we 
do not snow under our already 
heavily burdened taxpayers. 

JOSEPH A. NAVARRO 

129 Topsfield Rd., age 37 

Graduate of Saugus Public 
Schools, Burdett College and Bry- 
ant Stratton Business College. 

My experience as Contract Ad- 



ministrator, negotiating and ad- 
ministering large Government 
Contracts, qualifies me to intelli- 
gently evaluate the expenditures 
and needs of our school system. 

As all parents do, I wish to 
assure my children and the child- 
ren of Ipswich the best education 
possible. 

I fully realize that improve- 
ments and changes are constantly 
needed, and it is in this area 
that decisions made by the School 
Committee are most significant. 

In this age of spiraling costs 
and tax rates, all persons re- 
sponsible for the expenditure of 
the tax payers funds should be 
aware of the responsibility to 
both the school system and the 
tax payer. All expenditures should 
be weighed as to their merit in 
the system and the impact on the 
tax payers pocket-book. 

It is with this responsibility in 
mind that I seek this office, 
determined when elected to give 
Ipswich a fair return for its 
tax dollar. 

PHILIP P. VILADENIS 

68a Central St., age 46 

Local Public Schools Graduate 
Class 1936. 

Office Scientific Research and 
Development. 

Trained in administration and 
finance, electronics and associat- 
ed fields. 

Ten years in Supervision, local 
Electronics Firm. Seventeen years 
in the building business and the 
handling of accounts. Member of 
the Government study Committee. 

As a father of three in the 
School system, I am vitally inter- 
ested in the type of education our 
schools provide. 

As a School Committeeman, I 
would like to have a school 
system second to none, consistent 
with the ability of the taxpayers 
to provide. I will not be biased 
by others, and always strive to 
maintain high standards in every 
respect. 

My lengthy experiences permit 
me to act in best interest of all, 

DR. ROBERT E. WAITE 

65 South Village Green, age 40 

Athol (Mass.) High School. 
University of Notre Dame. Tufts 
University Dental School. 

Member" Ipswich Recreation 
Committee , Member Ipswich 
School Committee — 6 years. 
Chairman, Ipswich School Com- 
mittee — 5 years. Past President 
Kiwanis Club, Veteran World War 
H. 

Director, Ipswich Rotary Club. 
Commodore, Ipswich Outboard 



Club. Corporator, Ipswich Sav- 
ing Bank. 

Member of Post 80, American 
Legion, Ipswich Chamber of 
Commerce, Knights of Columbus, 
Fourth Degree, American Dental 
Asso., Pierre Fauchard Academy, 
Academy-International of Medi- 
cine and Dentistry, Delegate 
Mass. Dental Society House of 
Delegates. 

Naturally the "Bricks and Mor- 
tar" portion of the School Com- 
mittee's work is vital and neces- 
sary but the duties of this office 
that interest me most are those 
concerning educational policy 
making. 

At the time when I decided not 
to run for re-election I realized 
that there would be a time when 
I would like very much to return 
to serve on this extremely import- 
ant committee. I have never lost 
interest in public school education 
and earnestly hope that my fellow 
townspeople will grant me the 
honor of serving them again in 
a post I value highly. 



BOARD OF 

PUBLIC 
WELFARE 

UNCOMPLETED TERM 
ONE YEAR 

PETER A. JOHNSON 

10 Putnam Rd., age 63 

Past President of St. Mary of 
the Assumption Church for sev- 
eral years, on Ipswich Finance 
Committee 6 years and member 
of the original Sewerage Com- 
mittee. Have been in business in 
Ipswich since 1935 or 30 years 
and President of the North Shore 
Shellfish Co., Inc. for the past 
19 years. 

I am interested in people and 
feel that membership on the 
Board of Public Welfare will en- 
able me to be of service to those 
people in need of help. 

H. ERNEST STONE 

Scottons Lane, age 55 

Attended Ipswich Public Schools. 
Have been with James J. Welch 
Co. of Salem for thirty nine years, 
first as Superintendent of Con- 
struction and now as manager of 
Hamilton Hardware Store. 

Was a member of Ipswich Fin- 
ance Committee for ten years. 
Was unanimously appointed by 
Board of Selectmen and remain- 
ing members of Board of Public 
Welfare to fill a vacancy on that 
Board. 

I have a sincere interest in the 
affairs of our town and I would 
lapiijreciate the opportunity of 
serving on this Board for the 
coming year. 




ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1964 



The 331st year of operation as ation 
a municipal corporation 



Area of Town, 33 square miles 



Population in I960 census - 8529 









pn Voyvi ■ fCe c 






/: 



*p/0$ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Board of Selectmen 3-4 

Cemetery Department 26 

Civil Defense Agency 13 

Electric Department 20-21 

Engineering Department 22 

Executive Department 5-7 

Finance Department 8 

Financial Reports - Statements* F 1-46 

Fire Department 12-13 

Forestry Department 22 

Health Department 18 

Highway Department 24-25 

Ipswich Conservation Commission 29-30 

In Memoriam 37 

Ipswich Historical Commission 30-31 

List of Jurors 34 

Marine Department 13 

Personnel Board 32 

Planning Board 28-29 

Police Department 11-12 

Public Library 26-27 

Records Department 9 

Roster of Town Officials 35-36 

Recreation and Parks Department 15 

Report of the Safety Agent 19 

Salt Marsh Committee 30 

School Department 38-50 

Sewer Department 25 

Town Government Study Committee 3 1 

Town Meetings and Elections 10 

Traffic Study Committee 32-33 

Veterans Services 17 

Water Department 19 

Welfare Department 17 

Zoning Board of Appeals 28 

*Blue Pages 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
To The Townspeople of Ipswich 

Annually your Board of Selectmen submits its report to the people of Ipswich 
inorder to keep you fully informed relative to the general conditions of the Town 
and as to the activities of the Board in the performance of its duties. 

During the past year the Board, in addition to its previous duties, assumed 
the responsibility of administration of the Electric, Water and Sewer Departments 
as voted by the Town Meeting of 1963. As Electric Light Commissioners, the 
Board signeda contract with the Essex Electric System to provide Ipswich with a 
portion of its future electric needs. This was done after a comprehensive study 
andreport was made by Metcalf and Eddy, Consulting Electrical Engineers. The 
construction of a 23, 000-volt transmission line is now underway and work should 
be complete prior to December of 1965. This will insure the people of Ipswich 
an adequate power supply at no additional cost in the event of failure in any way 
at our municipal generating plant. 



In the Water Department, great progress was made this year in the completion 
of a new 3 -million gallon water storage tank on Town Hill and a 1 -million gallon 
water storage tank in the Linebrook Roadarea. This assures the people of Ipswich 
an adequate supply of water even during drought seasons. With the cooperation of 
the Conservation Commission, studies are being made into acquiring lands within 
the water shed of the Ipswich River to further insure a proper water supply for 
future needs. 

3 



As Sewer Commissioners, the Board reports that the expansion of the Sewer 
Treatment Plant has been completed. Half of the cost of this project was paid by 
the Federal Government and the new facilities, according to the Sewer Survey of 
1962, is adequate enough to take care of our needs for the foreseeable future. 
Extensions to the Sewer System were installed on the following streets: East, 
Hovey, Central, Washington, Brown, Liberty, Cottage, Maple and Lord's Square. 
In 1965, plans are now ready for sewer extensions to the following streets: County, 
Poplar, Payne and a portion of Argilla Road. The Board is in receipt of many 
requests from different areas within the Town for sewer extensions and will place 
these requests in the warrant for the annual Town Meeting. 

The progress made in the above -mentioned departments this year is indicative 
of the rapid growth of the Town and the needs for expansion of these basic facilities. 
It is with this in mind that your Board, in previous years, has recommended these 
improvements . 

In other phases of Town affairs, a portion of Topsfield Road was built under 
the Chapter 90 Road Construction Program. About 8 miles of road were resur- 
faced this year and Miles Lane was completely rebuilt. In 1965, the Board is 
embarking on a planned road resurfacing program with the hope that every road 
in the Town will be resurfacedat least once every five years. Maintenance of the 
Town Dump has been contracted to a private operator and this appears to solve 
the problem of keeping the dump in proper condition. 

The Board is in the process of buying leased lands in the municipal parking 
area. It is our opinion that as the Town continues to grow, additional funds should 
be appropriated to increase parking facilities and to purchase leased lands already 
used for this purpose. 

Increased space is required by the Police Department, both for office area 
and detention area. The Board, after investigating several proposals, has arrived 
at a solution which will be practical and economical. Funds are incorporated in 
the 1965 budget for this purpose. 

Ever cognizant of the alarming increase in the tax rate, the Board, in its 
deliberations of the budget for the coming year, effected many reductions in re- 
quests by department heads. It is to this end and the fulfillment of its other 
duties that the Board is committed. 

In conclusion, the Board expresses its gratitude for the fine cooperation 
received from other boards, committees, department heads, and town employees 
in the proper conduct of the Town's business. 



Respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John A. Pechilis, Chairman 
Nathaniel M. Quint 
John F. Conley 
Charles T. Passales 
Brainard C. Wallace 




EXECUTIVE SECRETARY JOHN R. HARRIGAN 

It is a pleasure to submit to you your Town Report for 1964 and to render an 
account of my stewardship and thus report to you at least in summary fashion the 
activities of your town departments and the major events of the past year. 

The year 1964 has proven to be one of accomplishments and a year in which 
the town made forward strides in all respects, including extension of sewer mains, 
improvements to the sewer treatment plant, power plant improvements, and an 
enlargement of our cooling pond. This is most significant to me and bodes well 
for our continuous growth and cooperation of all department heads. 

The citizens of Ipswich will be offered greater improvement in our water 
distribution system from a beneficial federal grant received from the Housing and 
Home Finance Agency in the amount of $193,000, coupled with matching funds 
providedby the foresight of the Ipswich taxpayers. The expenditures resulted in 
accomplishing the following installations: 

Contract No. 1 

One 3 -million gallon water storage tank. Cost $123, Z70. 00. Located stra- 
tegically on Town Hill. This tank is 114 inches in diameter and rises to a height 
of 54 feet. The design, material, and method of constructing the welded steel 
storage tank conforms to AWWA specifications and will replace our present open 
reservoir which will be eliminated. 



Contract No. 2 

Pumping Station and storage tank foundation. Cost $72,084.05. This contract 
consists of a water pumping station, complete with equipment and appurtenances , 
with concrete foundation for a steel storage tank. The contract also includes a 
drain line and connections to water mains. 



Contract No. 3 

Water Main Construction. Cost $128, 032. 99. This contract consisted of 
installing 13, 000 feet of water mains on Mile Lane, Linebrook Road and 9 new 
hydrants to serve an area that has an influx of development. 

The construction of a one-million gallon tank at Pinefield was completed and 
is now in operation serving the citizens in the general area of the subdivision. 

The town was also fortunate to receive a federal grant of $59, 000, and this 
was matched by the taxpayers of Ipswich. These funds were expended in the nature 
of an extension to our Sewer Treatment Plant, which consisted of furnishing and 
installing a 30-foot diameter digester gas holding cover, gas equipment, miscel- 
laneous piping equipment, electrical work and the construction of a Digester - 
Control Building and sludge drying beds. 

Extensions to our sewer system included installation of mains on East Street, 
Hovey Street, Maple Avenue, Liberty Street, Washington Street, Brown Street, 
Cottage Street, Lord Square, and a portion of Central Street. 

The highway department was used extensively on routine maintenance through- 
out the town. Their work consisted of road oiling and applying mix in place on 
approximately 8 miles of roadway. A program to continue the maintenance of our 
roadways in 1965 has been instituted by the highway superintendent. Drainage 
work was completed in many sections of town including Plains Road, Mitchell 
Road, Old England Road, Summer Street and Linebrook Road. Mile Lane was 
completely rebuilt with assistance from this department working in conjunction 
with the water main contractor. 

A survey of our water mains and gate valves was completed in October. This 
information, compiled in book form, will enable the water department to effectively 
control our service mains in times of emergencies and also aid in the proper 
distribution of water. These plans will be of further use as a training aid for the 
fire department in its accelerated training program which will be in effect in 1965 . 

Many improvements were completed within the town hall. New offices were 
built for the engineering, welfare, and civil defense departments. The remodeling 
and enlargement of office quarters made available a larger office on the second 
floor of the town hall for the veteran's agent. 

Chapter 90 work was continuedon Topsfield Roadand in November, the project 
was curtailed due to weather conditions. It is the intent of this office to let this 
project out on contract in 1965 thus allowing the town highway department to con- 
centrate on a road maintenance program that is of utmost importance. 

Purchasing Department 

During 1964, this department had the responsibility of acquiring for the 
townspeople, supplies, materials, and equipment at the most economical price 
possible. Only through careful and prudent purchasing, this was accomplished. 

Sealed bids were received on all purchases exceeding $500. Included in 
these items were the construction jobs and the renewal of contracts for annual 
requirements of commodities such as gasoline, motor and fuel oils, asphalt 
products, insecticides, trees, tires, tubes, fire hose, road salt, paints and 
mechanical equipment. 



No purchase in excess of $25 was made without authorization of the department 
head, purchasing agent, and the town accountant. 

Major equipment purchased included 1 Case Bulldozer and Trailer, 1 Police 
Sedan, 1 Police Station Wagon, 1 Fire Station Wagon, 1 Snow Plow and an additional 
hitch, 1 Electric Department one -half ton pick-up truck, 1 Sewer Department 
pick-up truck, 1 Forestry Department truck with winch equipment and 1 Cemetery- 
Department Jeep Truck. 

Through this department, a contract for managing our town dump was instituted 
and was awarded to the same firm who collects the rubbish. This relieves the 
town of a continued problem area. The contract price is $5500 per year; the length 
of the contract being for a three-year duration. It is estimatedthat the cost for the 
town to maintain the dump for one year is $8500; thus contractual service will save 
the town $3000 annually during the period of this contract. 

Major contracts including the sewer main extensions, sewer plant additions, 
pond construction at power plant, one 3 -million gallon tank, water pumping station, 
andwater main extension were governed by the decision of the purchasing agent, 
working closely with the Board of Selectmen. 

Sale of town property conducted through the year including streetlighting trans- 
formers, old cable, old motors, and piping were also put out on bid to salvage 
companies. 

I greatly appreciate the opportunity to have servedas your Executive Secretary 
for the past year. My heartfelt thanks is extended to the Board of Selectmen for 
their cooperation, and to the Town employees for their unselfish devotion to duty. 

It would be remiss for me, indeed, to fail to extend my sincerest thanks to 
the Townspeople for their faith and support. 




Water Storage Tank - Town Hill 
7 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

Accounting Division 

Robert H. Leet, Finance Director and Town Accountant 

The general financial records of the Town are maintained in this office as 
well as the accounts for the Water Department and Electric Department. Budget 
control reports were prepared monthly for all department heads and for other 
interested persons. Financial data for the annual budget, both preliminary and 
final, were prepared and distributed. A new format for the budget has been com- 
pleted to simplify the work in preparation and understanding of the budget. Reports 
were prepared for the Bureau of Accounts, banks and other financial institutions 
showing the complete financial transactions of the town. The Town's cash balance 
was verified with the Treasurer's Office each month. All bills were post audited 
before release for payment. Detailed financial statements for the Town of Ipswich 
for the year 1964 are set forth in the colored pages in the back portion of this 
report. 

Collection-Treasury Division 

George E. Mourikas, Collector-Treasurer 

Bills committed for collection during 1964 totaled $3, 003, 706. 76. The 
following tax bills were typed and sent out: 

Personal Property 646 

Real Estate 3924 

Motor Vehicle Excise 6249 

Farm Animal Excise 11 

Sewer Betterment 85 



Bills collected amounted to $2,625,539.39. Treasurer's receipts totaled 
$6, 226, 006. 45. During the year $864, 000. 00 was invested in Treasury Bills. 
This will earn $4880. 43 if held until maturity. 

The amount of $226, 000. 00 was paid off on maturing debt. A record of new 
debt bonded amounting to $814, 000. 00 was set up. 

Check register balances were reconciled with bank statements. Federal and 
State income tax statements were made up and distributed. A record of Trust 
Fund transactions was maintained. 

A schedule of receipts was rendered to the Town Accountant monthly. 



Assessing Department 

Seward S. Tyler, Assessor 

The assessed valuation of Real and Personal Property in the Town of Ipswich 
for 1964 was $14, 544,805. 00. This was an increase of $462,400 or 3. 28%. 

The Town appropriated $2, 629,594. 16, anincrease of $341,652. 40 or 1.493%. 



There were 6249 Motor Vehicle Excises committed to the Collector. The 
total valuation of the vehicles was $4, 174,039. 00, and the total tax was $235,07 1. 93, 
an increase of $54, 265, 33. 00 or 30. 01%. 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 

Anthony A. Murawski, Town Clerk 

VITAL STATISTICS: Comparative vital statistics recordedfor 1963 and 1964 
are as follows: 

1963 1964 

284 273 

137 124 

88 85 



296 
35 

167 
3 
3 

Total 504 

94 

183 

30 

22 

28 

18 

3 

2 

4 

10 

_5 

Total 399 



REVENUE (Turned into the Town Treasury) 

Dog Licenses 
Marriage Licenses 
Certified Copies 
Recordings 
Gas Renewals 
Miscellaneous 





Births 




Deaths 




Marriages 


LICENSES 




Dog: 


Males 




Females 




Spayed Females 




Kennels: $10.00 




$25. 00 


Fish & 


Fishing 


Game: 


Hunting 




Sporting 




Sporting (Free, over 70 yrs. 




of age) 




Fishing, Minor 




Female 




Non-Resident 




Alien 




Trapping 




Archery Stamps 




Duplicate license 



Total 



1, 


080. 


00 




128. 


00 




37. 


50 




610. 


00 




. 


50 




34. 


00 


$1 


,890 


. 00 



TOWN MEETING AND ELECTIONS 



March 2 



Annual Town Meeting 
Warrant contained 56 articles 
Voters present: 946 



March 9 



Annual Town Elections 
Votes cast as follows: 

Precinct 1 838 

2 790 

3 740 

4 1065 
Total 3433 



April 28 



Presidential Primary- 
Precincts grouped. 
Polling place: Winthrop School 
Votes cast: 

Republican 233 

Democratic 132 

Total 365 



September 10 



State Primary- 
Precincts grouped. 
Polling place: Winthrop School 
Votes cast: 

Republican 963 

Democratic 611 

Total 1574 



November 3 



State Elections 




Votes cast as follows: 




Precinct 1 


1135 


2 


1129 


3 


1040 


4 


1331 


Total 


4642 



Central Voting 



Number of Registered Voters 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Total 



1184 
1268 
1183 
1530 
5165 



10 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Stanley J. Surpitski, Chief 

There were three hundred sixty four court cases during 1964 and are classified 
as follows: 

Assault 4 

Attaching plates to car other than assigned to 2 

Breaking and entering 3 

Delinquents 13 

Disturbing the peace 9 

Drunkenness 39 

Excessive speed 122 

Failing to keep to the right of road 2 

Larceny 21 

Load spillage 3 

Leaving the scene of accident after causing property damage 3 

Misappropriation of car 2 

Malicious mischief to property 4 

Non-support 4 

Operating under influence of liquor 9 

Operating after revocation or suspension of license 6 

Operating so as to endanger 4 

Operating without a license 12 

Operating unregistered car 3 

Operating uninsured car 3 

Passing car where view is obstructed 4 

Passing school bus 9 

Violation of stop sign 15 

Violation no inspection sticker 13 

Statutory Rape 4 

Violating Gaming Laws 2 

Miscellaneous 49 

These cases were disposed of in the following manner: 

Appealed 14 

Continued Generally 1 

Dismissed for want of prosecution 29 

Discharged 15 

Filed 22 

Filed cost of Court 119 

Fined 124 

Held for Grand Jury 6 

Probation 8 

Restitution 3 

Released 2 

Suspended Sentence 8 

Sentenced to House of Correction 6 

Turned over to other police departments 5 

Continued for disposition 2 

The two cruisers traveled 58,809 miles and the ambulance 2697 miles. 

Automobiles stolen 21 

Automobiles recovered 16 

Ambulance runs 240 

11 



Automobile accidents reported over $200 damage or injury 134 

Automobile accidents reported under $200 damage and no injury 210 

Automobiles transferred 1081 

Animals found 28 

Animals lost 67 

Animals destroyed 23 

Animals Killed 47 

Animals reported injured 73 

Assistance rendered to persons in distress 9 

Persons bitten by dogs 46 

Bicycles registered for 1964 258 

Business establishments found open at night and secured 285 

Clam permits issued non-resident, $10 each 53 

Clam permits issued non-resident, $1 each 799 

Clam permits issued resident $2 each 482 

Criminal summons served 232 

Persons reported injured 88 

Persons reported missing from home and found 33 

Sudden deaths investigated 16 

Parking summons issued 621 

Complaints investigated 1724 

With the increase of our permanent and summer residents, the police de- 
partment at times is understaffed. To provide adequate police patrol to the out- 
lying districts and protection to school children using crosswalks on the outskirts 
of the community, it is my feeling that the police force should be increased by 
three additional patrolmen. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Russell Scahill, Chief 

The fire department had another busy year in 1964 with a total of 425 runs. 
The department put in more man hours on the grass and wood fires than they did 
in 1963. There were 95 bell alarms and 330 still alarms recorded in 1964. The 
loss of two lives during the year was due to the fact that the fire was not discovered 
in time. There were two large fires, both of which were total losses; namely, 
the Northeastern Supply Company and the Dustbane Company. Sherwin-Williams 
Company was a near total loss. 

The Mutual Aid System that the town of Ipswich is now connected with has 
proven to be of great value to the department, as it is easier to call in help from 
out of town much quicker than the old system. The Fire Prevention Program is 
also becoming a major factor because of the continuing increase of new construction. 

Rescue work is increasing each year with a steady increase in the boating 
population to a point where a larger boat is becoming a necessity. 

The National Board of Fire Underwriters made a survey of the town during 
the past year and will forward a report of their findings in the near future. 

The department is still in need of more manpower. A new station should be 
considered as soon as possible. I am also asking the town to consider the pur- 
chase of two new trucks to replace one which is thirty years old. A second vehicle 
isinneedof major repairs which will bring no guarantee of it being a first-class 
piece of apparatus for the town. 

12 



The vehicles of the department covered approximately 22, 000 miles during 
1964. A total of 25, 500 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose was used; 11, 950 feet of 1 1/2- 
inch hose, and 600 feet of 1 1/8-inch hose. A total of 186, 225 gallons of water 
was used from the booster tanks. 

A total of $213, 703 was paid out by insurance companies for fire losses on 
an estimated total of $564, 350 on buildings valued at $146, 000. 

Listed below are other activities performed by the department in 1964: 



Blasting Permits Issued 19 

Oil Burner Inspections 197 

Complaints Investigated 250 

Fire Burning Permits Issued 525 

Christmas Trees Sprayed 475 

Checking and Filling Fire Extinguishers 395 



CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 

Elmer Cowperthwaite, Director 

Interest in Civil Defense has increased somewhat in the past year, ai^dwe 
now have 131 people connected with the various units. 

Our communications unit has been extended by additional radio transceivers 
which were bought in kit form, and assembled here. Five of these were built 
and will be placed in our five shelters when and if needed. Radio operators have 
volunteered to report to each of the shelters should the need arise. 

Personnelfrom the Auxiliary Police-Fire Departments have also volunteered 
to man shelters in emergency. 

Civil Defense Auxiliary Fire Department has been quite active this past year, 
and at the request of the Fire Chief have responded to 83 alarms requiring 1069 
man hours. With the addition of our new 900 gallon tank truck, we are now better 
equipped to fight forest fires. 

Work donated to put this truck in condition kept the cost to the town down to 
$37.05. The Auxiliary Department spent $90.61 from their funds for parts and 
other items. 

The Auxiliary Police were used several times by request of the Police Chief. 

It is hoped that increased training at the Topsfield Disaster Training School 
will be available this coming year. 



MARINE DEPARTMENT 

Arthur Moon, Commissioner 

The records for 1964 indicate an excellent year for shellfish in all areas. 
More clams could have been harvested, but there was no market for them. Men 
were employed removing mussels, horseshoe crabs, algae, and other marine 
life harmful to shellfish. Over 25 bushels of seed clams were removed that were 

13 



smothering the clams under them. The seed was transplanted in other flats. 

Twenty-one clam leases were issued by the Board of Selectmen for clam 
farming; eleven of which were cancelledfor violation of the regulations pertaining 
to clam farms. 

Licenses and estimated consumption in 1964 were as follows: 

Soft shell clams 15,811 bushels, commercial 

1,350 bushels, non-commercial 

Sea Clams 1, 100 bushels 

Permits Issued --Clams 799 one-day non-resident 

53 non-resident yearly 
481 resident, yearly 
83 commercial 

One man was convicted of a clam violation and nineteen were is sued warnings 
for minor violations. 

There were several meetings with the clam advisory board on minor problems. 

Once again the river off eredthousands of boating enthusiasts many pleasurable 
hours of summer relaxation. Channel and speed zone markers were put in the 
Eagle Hill and Castle Neck Rivers. At the town wharf, new barrels were put 
under the floats, floats were repaired and new anchor chains were installed to 
assure safe boating. All waters were patrolled night and day, assisted by the 
police patrol boat on week ends. Seventy-one warning tickets were issued; the 
town boat answered 39 calls for assistance; eleven persons were rescued from 
the water after their boats had overturned; twenty-seven boats were reported 
missing or stolen, 26 were recovered; twenty one motors were reported stolen 
or missing, 20 -were recovered. 

Two drownings were recorded, one off the beach of Plum Island and one from 
a boating accident. 




Good Digging - Ipswich Clams 
14 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

It is pleasing to report that the past year was both a happy and successful one 
for the Recreation Department and the hundreds of citizens of all ages who took 
part in the many and varied programs offered. Many new features were added 
for both youngsters and adults including a gymnastics program for students, a 
tennis tourney for all age groups, a horseshoe pitching league for adult men, an 
accelerated summer playground program, new winter classes for adults and many 
others too numerous to mention here. 

It is the intention of the Recreation Committee and Director to further enhance 
the overall program during the current year by the introduction of additional new 
activities for young and old while at the same time continuing those programs that 
we have met with success in the immediate past. 

Mindful of the continuing increase in the population, your Recreation depart- 
ment has been constantly alert for the procurement and development of new play- 
lots. In this category, we are happy to announce that Howe Memorial Park 
located within the new Campanelli development will be officially opened this 
summer. It is the hope of the Recreation Committee that funds will be made 
available to install some equipment there. It is also planned to assign a playground 
leader to this area that has come into the possession of the town and department 
at no cost. 

Through the civic cooperation of the Ipswich Fish and Game Club, still another 
playlot will be activated on their property off Paradise Road this summer. This 
new area is being made available at no cost to the town and will be supervised 
during the regular playground season. 

There remains an additional need for other playgrounds in other areas of our 
expansive town that appears to be growing by leaps and bounds. It is expected 
that space for these new areas will become available to the town and department 
at no cost except for normal maintenance and supervision where practical. Re- 
quests are already in for playlots at Great Neck and that section of Linebrook 
Road beyond the turnpike. 

The Golden Age Club directly associated with the Recreation department has 
also enjoyed a most successful year. Its membership now approaches 400 with 
100 members consistently in attendance at their meetings held on the first and 
third Tuesdays of each month. Members have many happy memories of the special 
events they took in this past year including day trips to country fairs, events at 
Boston Garden, historic tours and many others. Warren E. Grant, Sr. is serving 
his fifth term as President of this active club that continues to provide many won- 
derful people with many happy times. 

This report, however, would not be complete without expressing my sincere 
thanks to the Recreation-Parks Committee, town officials, department heads, 
local organizations and a host of individuals for their support and cooperation that 
has contributed in large measure to the success of the Recreation program which 
I am confident is among the best in the state. 

Many gratifying improvements were accomplished during the past year that 
we feel have added to the beauty of our parks and playgrounds. Perhaps foremost 
amongst these was the continued expansion of the beach parking lot at the Light- 
house property, the construction and installation of a new board walk to the beach, 

15 



the widening of the road to the town parking lot, and the elimination of a blind 
corner at the entrance to the parking lot. It is planned to continue these projects 
this year and to take steps to beautify the lighthouse cottage and grounds. 

A marked improvement on the South Common was the elimination of bushes 
in the vicinity of the Appleton Memorial monument which not only obscured the 
view of the historic landmark, but also posed a traffic hazard. The general area 
around the Appleton monument was given a face lifting and the fountain itself 
activated for the first time in many years. 

Decorative cement benches were also placed on the South Common. Regular 
park benches were placed in other areas of town and on the playgrounds. All have 
been widely used and will require but a minimum of maintenance. 

A special effort was made by the Park Commission to beautify the town for 
17th Century Day. 

Many trees were planted at needed spots especially at Howe Memorial Park 
in the outer Linebrook section. Much gravel, loam and seed was also used in 
improving many areas coming under the jurisdiction of the Commission. 

A new front lawn was planted at the Memorial Building and the back yard was 
cleared of growth and debris that had accumulated over the years. Barring lawn 
furniture, it is now suitable for lawn parties. 

Three new lawn mowers were purchased and additional small equipment is 
being sought this year to help facilitate the work of the department. The acreage 
that the Park department is required to care for is constantly expanding bringing 
about the need for modern equipment and efficient work schedules. 

Major repairs have also started on the Little League fence at Linebrook play- 
ground and will be completed in time for the start of the baseball season. 

It is our intention to make major improvements to the skating rink at Line- 
brook playground that is widely used both summer and winter. Other improvement 
projects are also on the planning board.s. 



16 



EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS SERVICES 

Frank Story, Director 

The number of Veterans and their dependents receiving Veterans Benefits is 
being reported as to the number of cases per month- -January - 30, February - 
27, March - 23, April - 17, May - 17, June - 17, July - 22, August - 21, Sep- 
tember - 20, October - 21, November - 19, December 27. 

The disbursements under this program may be found under the town account- 
ant's report. It should be noted that 50% of the benefits program is reimbursed 
to the town by the state. 

There are two important programs under the Veterans Administration in 1965. 
Effective January 1, 1965, there is a new pension law in effect, which could make 
some veterans and widows eligible, having been denied under prior laws. Effec- 
tive May 1, 1965 will be the reopening of the G. I. insurance for eligible veter- 
ans. 

For assistance on veterans services, contact the veterans service office at 
the Town Hall or call 356-3915. 

Services rendered to Veterans and their Dependents 



Six applications of eligibility, 52 V. A. questionnaires, 1 indemnity compen- 
sation, 2 assistance to allied veterans, 11 applicants admitted to V. A. Hospital, 
1 Social Security disability, 9 applications for lost discharges, 2 reinstatements 
of widows' pensions, 1 Korean bonus appeal, 12 changes of address, 4 education 
assistance, 1 War Orphan Act, 12 cases assisted with undertakers, 2 changes of 
beneficiary, 7 real estate exemption, 780 vital statistical papers, 380 papers veri- 
faxed. 

There were 11 widows' pensions obtained and 10 service and non-service. 
A direct saving to the town of $29, 781. 00 yearly. 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Mary C. Levesque, Director 

The Welfare assistance case load at the end of the year totaled as follows: 
Old Age Assistance, 63; Aid to Dependent Children, 13 cases, 46 recipients; Med- 
ical Assistance to the Aged, 28; Disability Assistance, 14; General Relief, 5. 
The State and Federal governments reimburse to the Town approximately 80 per 
cent of the total assistance rendered in the majority of the assistance programs. 
A $1.00 monthly increase for Leisure Time Activities was received by all recip- 
ients of Old Age Assistance. 

In the Administrative Department, several changes took place during the year. 
Due to an increase in the amount of paper work now required by the State and Fed- 
eral governments, the State Department of Public Welfare recommended and 
approved the hiring of one additional clerk and recommended that the Department 
expand its office work area. New quarters were built on the second floor of the 
Town Hall and the Department moved in February, 1964. The present staff con- 
sists of: Mary C. Levesque, Director; Constance M. Como, Social Worker; Edith 
Ciavola, Junior Clerk-Typist; and Linda Kompa, Junior Clerk-Stenographer. 

The Board of Public Welfare, consisting of three members, Mr. Charles 
Rose, Mr. Ernest Stone, and Mrs. Edna Graffum, sits in executive session every 
other Monday night at 7:30 P. M. 

17 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Roland R. Foucher, Health Agent 

The following clinics were held throughout the year: 

Well Child Clinic: This clinic is for pre-school children and babies. The 
children are weighed, measured, examined and immunized against diphtheria, 
tetanus, whooping cough and polio. Dr. Frank Collins and the school nurse Violet 
DeMille, R.N. conduct this clinic. In the school system, 568 children were given 
double antigen shots for diphtheria, and 386 were given Mantoux tests for tuber- 
culosis. 

X-Ray Clinic: Through the cooperation of the Health Department and the 
Essex County Health Association, the mobile X-ray unit was at the Fire Station 
the week of November 13, 1964. A total of 935 people were X-rayed at no cost to 
the Town. 

Rabies Clinic: July 19, 1964 at the Town Garage, Dr. Cornelius Thibeault 
immunized 125 dogs against rabies. 

Permits and Licenses 



Building and alteration 
Gas appliance 
Sub-surface drainage 



76 

156 

51 



Plumbing 

Sewer connection 



238 
49 



Slaughtering 

Motel and camp 

Milk and cream (store) 

Ice cream manufacturing 

Sewage disposal installation 



1 Milk pasteurizing 4 

6 Methyl alcohol 22 

25 Milk and cream (vehicle) 9 

3 Grease and tallow and bones 3 

12 Cesspool cleaning 3 



There were 18 abatement notices sent out by certified mail for miscellaneous 
nuisances, and they were all taken ca,re of. 

All cattle arriving in Ipswich from out of state are inspected by animal inspec- 
tor John Wegzyn to detect any illness and to see if they are properly ear tagged. 
An inventory of all animals in Town is made annually, this includes horses, cows, 
steers, calves, sheep, goats, donkeys, etc. 

There were 33 dog bites reported to the Health Department in 1964, the dogs 
involved in these cases were ordered confined for a period of 10 days. 

At the November meeting, the Board of Health unanimously approved a sys- 
tem of two leaching pits and a 1, 000 gallon septic tank for all new construction in 
Ipswich. (This is a minimum figure as percolation tests may require a larger 
system). 

Cooperation between the Health Department and all the other Town Boards 
has been gratifying. 



18 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Dana G. Parsons, Foreman 

During 1964, the following was accomplished by this department: 

Twenty-two new year round services were installed by the Water Depart- 
ment. A total of 68 new services were installed at various sub-divisions. Mis- 
cellaneous work consisted of repairing curb boxes, renewing of services from main 
to curb box. Turning off and turning on summer services. Extension of water 
mains on Farley Ave. , replacement of water main at Eagle Hill, and water main 
extended on Labor -in -Vain Rd. and School St. 

In the numerous sub -divisions throughout the town there has been added ap- 
proximately 5,550 feet of new water mains. There was a total of 19 new hydrants 
installed throughout our water distribution system. All these hydrants were in- 
stalled with gate valves preceding same. 

A revitalized program to meter the entire town has progressed satisfactory 
with the first step taken by an accelerated training program for a water department 
employee in the repairing and rebuilding of water meters. 

A total of 131 meters were changed due to leakage and the fact that they were 
not working. Approximately 87 meters were put into operation at the Campanelli 
development. Fifty-nine new meters were purchased and installed. 

This program now in full swing, with the expectations of concrete results, 
will be continued during the fiscal year of 1965. 



REPORT OF THE SAFETY AGENT 

Elmer Cowperthwaite, Safety Agent 

lam sorry to report that during 1964, we had one accidental death by elec- 
trocution; namely, Mr. FredRodzen, an electric light department lineman. This 
department has an excellent training program on safety, and it is regrettable that 
this accident occurred. 

There was a total loss of 85 days due to accidents; electric department, 73; 
water department, 2; and forestry department, 10. The high loss of time in the 
electric department was causedby injury to one of the power plant operators, which 
at first seemed to be a minor back condition, but which later proved to be of a more 
serious nature. 

Additional film is available through insurance companies and industries on 
safety procedures, and this office will incorporate its use in its safety program 
whenever possible. 



19 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Alfred L. Tobiasz, Manager 

The Electric Department engaged the services of Engineering Consultants to 
make a study of the electric system and submit recommendations on the method 
of expanding our facilities to provide an additional power supply to meet the in- 
crease in demand for electricity. The report was submitted on May 13, 1964 
with recommendations that the Town should consider a tie connection with an 
outside power source to increase the reliability of the supply in the event the power 
station should fail and provide additional capacity without increasing the bonded 
indebtedness to finance the expansion of the generating plant. 

The recommendations were studied by the Electric Advisory Board and the 
Electric Light Commissioners and on June 22, 1964 the Commissioners signed a 
contract with the Massachusetts Electric Company to provide a transmission line 
ratedat 15, 000 KVA from Groveland to the Ipswich-Rowley Town Line. The Town 
will build the line from Rowley Line to the proposed substation near the power 
plant and it will be connected to operate in conjunction with the generating plant. 

Bids were received and a contract awarded to a general contractor to dredge 
the existing cooling pond used for cooling the diesel generating units at the power 
plant, and construct an auxiliary cooling pond to provide additional cooling capacity 
during the summer period. 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission and our State Representative made 
arrangements with the U. S. Soil Conservation Service to furnish engineering ser- 
vices including drawings and supervision for the pond construction at no expense 
to the Town. 

Approximately 2800 circuit feet of three phase 15 MV spacer cable was in- 
stalled on Howe Street and 2400 feet of single phase on Allen Lane. 

All distribution feeders originally connected to the power plant bus were 
connected to the Elm Street Substation. This will provide better voltage to the 
consumer and lower the line losses on the system. 

Service Connections Meters 



Year 


KWH Sales 


1960 


22, 523, 288 


1961 


24, 17 1,963 


1962 


26, 103, 305 


1963 


27,806, 692 


1964 


28,682,901 


Maintenance 





2994 3636 

2996 3678 

3052 3732 

3135 3843 

3206 3916 



Thirty-one poles, ninety-eight service cables, 22, 820 feet of wire were 
replaced. Sixty-six streetlighting fixtures were replaced with units of higher 
wattage rating. 

New Construction 



Seventy-four streetlight fixtures, seventy-one services, 15,445 feet of wire, 
fifty-five poles and 925 KVA of transformer capacity were added to the system 
by the Department personnel. 



20 



Capacitors were installed on the system to improve the power factor and 
lower the distribution line losses. 

Construction in 1965 

1. Substation, controls, switchgear and 24 KV transmission line for connection 
to Massachusetts Electric Company. 

2. New floor and structural changes in power plant. 

3. Install new spray cooling pipe system on cooling pond site. 

4. Install 15 KV 3£ spacer cable on Edge Street. 

5. Plant trees or shrubbery around the Elm Street Substation. 

Generation 

Scheduled maintenance was carried out by station personnel and all diesel 
generating units are in good operating condition. 

The peak demand was 6820 on December 22, 1964 and the kilowatt production 
increased from 29, 743, 040 in 1963 to 30, 547, 740 in 1964. 




Training Program on Safety 



21 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Philip L. Pattison, Town Engineer 

On matters relating to engineering and technical matters, the town engineer 
serves in an advisory capacity to the administrative and department officials of 
the community. 

The following projects for which all or part of the engineering plans were 
prepared and supervised were: 

Drainage: -UnionStreet, TopsfieldRoad, Central Street, Wilcomb's Square, Hovey 
Street, Brown Street, Mitchell Road, Stage Hill Road, Municipal Parking Lot 
(Town Hall) and Lord's Square. 

Highway Resurfacing- -Top sfield Road (Chapter 90 Maintenance), Depot Square, 
and Market Street, South Main Street, Central Street, Elm Street and the town 
hall parking lot. 

Sidewalks --Market Square, Market Street, High Street, School Street. 

Sanitary Sewers --Hovey Street, East Street, Brown Street, Cottage Street, Maple 
Avenue, Liberty Street, Washington Street, Central Street and Lord's Square. 

Road Construction--Topsfield Road (Chapter 90), Mile Lane and School Street. 

Walls --Topsfield Road (Chapter 90). 

Engineering studies and recommendations were made for the following: 

Drainage --Farley Brook, Kimball Brook, Mile Lane, Linebrook Road, Kimball 
Avenue, Pine Street, and the following developments: Campanelli, George, Abell, 
Hussey, and Scott Hill Road. 

Sanitary Sewer --Linebrook Road, Kimball Street, High Street, School Street, 
Avery Street, Dornell Road, Union Street, Estes Street, Kimball Avenue, Elm 
Street, TopsfieldRoad, Hayward Street, Brown's Square, Municipal Parking Lot, 
County Street, County Road, Poplar Street, Payne Street and Argilla Road. 

Sidewalks --High Street, Linebrook Road and Washington Street. 

Road Construction -- Topsfield Road, Argilla Road, and Jeffreys Neck Road. 

Completion of the access road to the high school, partial construction of 
Topsfield Road; the sanitary sewer in the East, Brown and Central Streets area; 
and increasedplanning board work accountedfor the major share of the engineering 
department's workload. 

Engineering studies were as follows: Assisted in up-dating the tax maps; 
a study of the Ernest George Subdivision (Linebrook Road) area; a sewer study 
of the Sylvania- Top sfield Road area, and a re -study of the South Side sewer 
extension. 



22 




Line Clearance With Use Of Skybucket 
FORESTRY DEPARTMENT 



Armand Michaud, Forestry Warden 

During the spring of 1964, seventy-six new trees of various types were planted 
throughout the town. 

Spraying with Sevin and Methoxaclore was conducted throughout the town for 
the control of Dutch Elm disease during the months of March, May and June. 
Also, spraying was done for the control of Birch Leaf Miners. 

A survey was taken with the Department of Natural Resources of the Great 
Neck area for tent caterpillars and about 200 acres should be controlled with 
ground spraying. This will be done early next spring. 

Samples were taken in July for Dutch Elm disease and thirty-four trees were 
found diseased. All were taken down and burned. 

In December, thirteen beetle infested trees on private property were removed 
with state help. 

Trees were removed on Topsfield Road to assist the highway department in 
the construction of this Chapter 90 road. 

Tree removals were made and pruning done for the cemetery department. 
Brush and trees were cut on Argilla Rd. , Mile Lane, Candlewood and Linebrook 
Roads in cooperation with the light department doing routine line work. 

Forestry department trucks and men were used in snow removal work and 
also in moving tables, chairs and voting booths for town meetings and elections. 

23 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Woodrow Hills, Superintendent 

Summer Maintenance 

A total of 1003 tons of patch was used in street repairs. Catch-basin clean- 
ing this year was done by an outside contractor with one man from the highway 
department as a helper. A total of 596 basins were cleaned. 

All the remaining gravel roads were regularly scraped and graded. The 
sweeper, except in the winter months, was in operation three days each week. 

Crosswalks and some traffic lines in the business area were painted. The 
painting of long center lines was put on bids. The hired contractor painted about 
80, 000 running feet of lines. 

A headwall on Fellows Rd. was rebuilt and two basins and some additional pipe 
laid on Mitchell Rd. Thirty feet of 30" metal pipe was laid across the Old Right 
Rd. , and two cross over pipes laid on Pine Swamp Rd. About 150 ft. of 12" drain 
was put in on upper Summer St. to replace an old tile drain. 

The department helped in the reconstruction of Mile Lane, the new road at the 
new high school and on the widening of Linebrook Rd. 

The curb on Union St. was reset, new basins built and the street hot topped. 

Market St. was widened at the Post Office and resurfaced with hot top. 

Also hot topped were Hovey, Brown and Liberty Streets and Maple Avenue 
where sewer extensions had been installed. 

Thirteen streets were oiled under the Highway summer maintenance appro- 
priation. 

Winter Maintenance 

A total of 245 tons of salt and 2147 tons of sand were used in snow removal 
operations. Sand barrels for emergency use were out in various parts of town. 
Trucks and men from the forestry, water, cemetery and recreation departments 
helped in this work. Two hired trucks plowed regular routes in each storm and 
the town bulldozer was used to push snow off the town wharf. 

Special Appropriations 

The reconstruction of Topsfield Rd. with Chapter 90 funds was continued. 

Three hundred feet of 12" pipe was laid and two basins built on Mitchell Rd. 

The town hall parking lot, part of Elm St. and South Main St. from the town 
hall to Market Square was hot-topped after widening the road at Choate bridge. 

Central St. from the Market Square to the Winthrop school was widened and 
resurfaced with hot-top. 

The sidewalk on Central St. from Mineral St. to Lord's Square was gravelled 
and a new hot-top sidewalk constructed from Kimball Ave. to the new high school. 



24 



New Equipment 

A Case Diesel crawler tractor with loader, a 12 ton General trailer to carry 
the Case tractor, a Flink skid mounted sand and salt spreader and trailer and a 
stone spreader were added to the department. 




Sewer Treatment Plant Improvement 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Sewer Treatment Plant- -Chester Wile, Operator 

During 1964, 51,395,000 gallons were pumped from the Town Wharf Pumping 
Station to the Sewage Treatment Plant, or an average of 140, 805 per day, as com- 
pared to an average of 79, 071 gallons per day in 1963. 

A total of 12, 000 pounds of chlorine was added to the effluent before being 
discharged into the outfall sewer which flows into the ocean. A total of 1490 
pounds of hot lime was added to the Digestor. This was a decrease from the pre- 
vious year as the digestor was by -passed during new construction. 

A daily maintenance program is carried out at the Town Wharf Pumping 
Station and at the Sewage Treatment Plant. Daily records are kept for the State 
Department of Public Health. 

Forty-nine new sewer house connections were installed in 1964. After in- 
stallation and inspection, the water meter was read and the reading submitted to 
the Town Accountant so that the householder could be billed for the usage charge. 



25 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr. , Superintendent 

The Annual Report of the Cemetery Department for the year ending December 
31, 1964. 

During this year, we have developed in the New Highland Cemetery, a section 
containing 120-4 grave lots under the direction of our newly appointed Superintend- 
ent Walter Hulbert, Jr. 

The deep gully between the Legion and Cowles Memorial Cemeteries has been 
filled in and graded and will be seeded this spring. A parcel of land was purchased 
from Mr. Elmer Hills to enlarge the Linebrook Cemetery. 

During this year there were (103) burials as compared to (89) the previous 
year. 

Following is a list of the monies turned in to the Town from the Department: 

Burials -Opening Graves $ 4,722.00 

Sale of Liners 600. 00 

Use of Tent 210. 00 

Sale of Lots 750. 00 

Foundations 987. 25 

Annual Care 950.70 

Perpetual Care-New Lots 3, 100. 00 

Perpetual Care-Income from Fund 3,400.00 

Perpetual Flower Fund-Income from Fund 200. 00 

Total $14,919.95 

We wish to thank the several Town Departments that have been most coopera- 
tive during this year. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Hester L. Mitchell, Librarian 

The year 1964 was the busiest in the history of library service to the public. 
A total of 94, 970 books were borrowed for home use and 17, 3 12 were used in the 
building, making a total of 112, 282 volumes used from the public library during 
the twelve month period. Library patrons totaled an adult attendance of 22, 065 
and a children's of 17,453, making an attendance figure of 40, 058. The book 
collection of 33, 119 fills the building so that for the 3000 new books added during 
the year, the same number had to be withdrawn because of space shortage. 
Sixty-two collections of books for classroom use were borrowed, and registration 
statistics show that 3, 544 townspeople currently use the library. 

The Adult Book Review Group met monthly to review and discuss current 
purchases and trends in reading. In addition, lectures on the library's reference 
books were given first-year students from Notre Dame Novitiate; instruction 
lessons also for school classes of the intermediate grades, and story programs 
for grades 1-3. 

The Library participated in the North Shore Library Week held in Peabody 
during the week of May 11; it trained two senior business students during the 
Ipswich High School Work Experience program in May; and highlights in the area 

26 



of gifts were the book collection from the estate of Robert Gray Dodge; and the 
record books (1636-1935) with display case presented in April by the Feoffees of 
the Ipswich Grammar School. 

Of a requested appropriation of $38, 000, a sum of $30, 000 plus $2, 136 State 
Aid Grant was votedfor library service. In order to operate as closely as possible 
to the amount the town wished to spend for library services, two part-time va- 
cancies were not filled, leaving the library understaffed for the year; necessary 
equipment was not purchased; needed repainting was postponed andproposed salary 
adjustments cancelled. In spite of all this, the total money spent on public library 
service reached $37, 38 1, which was $5, 245 over the town appropriation. The 
Trustees felt the need to continue in full operation because of the heavy use of the 
library facilities by the public, so services, hours and programs were not cur- 
tailed to keep within the total income. However, this situation cannot be continued. 

On June 1, 1964, the library hours were changed in order to offer more 
service to the public. They are at present: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays - 10 a. m. to noon; 1 p. m. to 5:30 p. m. ; and Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
12:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

A detailed listing of library income and expenses for the year 1964 follows: 

Income 

Town Appropriation $32, 135.99 

Books lost and sold 58.38 

Donations 3 1. 56 

Fines 853.42 

Non-Resident Fees 35.00 

Trust Funds 2, 461. 04 

Total Income $3 5, 57 5. 39 

Expenditures 

Salaries 

Full-time Employees (6) $24,016.80 

Part-time Employees 2, 523. 20 26, 540. 00 
Other Expense 

Books 7,424.07 

Periodicals 333. 17 

Postage 128.71 

Supplies 451. 67 

Trust Fund expense 156. 50 

Fuel 577. 02 

Insurance 306. 14 

Maintenance 670. 13 

Electricity 445. 94 

Water 20. 00 

Telephone 295. 24 

Dues and meetings 33.00 10,841.59 

Equipment 
Improvements 



Total Expenditures 37, 381. 59 

Expense in excess of Income $ 1, 806. 20 

27 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. , Chairman 

In 1964, the Zoning Board of Appeals held nine hearings on requests for vari- 
ances from the Zoning By-laws. Of these, three requests were granted, three 
denied, one continued, and two were affirmative opinions that the properties in 
question conformed to and were covered by the special exceptions of the By-law. 

The three variances grantedwere for side yard, rear yard and area require- 
ments. In each case, the Board felt that denial of the request would have created 
hardship for the applicants, while the granting of the requests in no way derogated 
from the general intent and purpose of the By-laws and was not detrimental to the 
public good. 

Of the three requests that were denied, one was to convert a single residence 
home into three apartments, another was to allow land zoned for general residence 
to be used for highway business, and the third was a special request to place a 
trailer on a piece of property. The Board in all cases felt that the general intent 
and purpose of the By-law would have been jeopardized had these requests been 
granted. Particularly in the case of allowing an area zoned for general residence 
to be used for highway business the Board felt that such a large amount of land so 
converted would amount to rezoning which the Board has no right to do. Such a 
request is the prerogative of the Town and should be sought by means of amend- 
ment to the By-laws and voted on at Town Meeting. 

Copies of the Zoning By-law are available at the Town Hall and the Board 
hopes interested citizens will use them andbecome better acquainted with the pur- 
pose of Zoning in Ipswich. 

The Board wishes to thank Town Counsel Raymond Sullivan for his assistance 
during the past year. 

PLANNING BOARD 

John R. Logan, Chairman 

The Board completed over 18 months of studies on the Master Plan in April 
and the final report was presented to the Board on June 16, 1964. The Master 
Plan is intended as a guide to the long range, orderly growth of the Town. It 
includes studies of land use, traffic and circulation, population, community 
facilities, zoning, subdivision regulations and capital improvements. The Board 
urges all interested citizens, Town boards, departments and committees to avail 
themselves of these valuable and timely studies. 

The amendment to the Zoning By-Law changing the requirements of the 
Summer Residence District from a minimum of 9000 square feet lots to 18, 000 
square feet was proposed by the Board. A public hearing was held and the amend- 
ment was adopted by the Annual Town Meeting. 

The Board spent considerable time reviewing subdivision plans. Definitive 
plans for four new subdivisions encompassing 173 lots were submitted to the Board 
during 1964. Additional preliminary plans were also submitted and these continue 
under discussion and review by the Board. In addition, much time was devoted to 
subdivisions that are in various stages of construction. 



28 



The efforts of the Board and the Town Engineer were successful in having the 
developer of Dornell Road, which had been the concern of the Board for some 
time, make significant improvements to this street. 

The Board appeared before or notified the Board of Appeals during the year 
regarding its recommendations on the granting of variances that were requested. 

The Board was vitally involved in the acquisition by the Town of a large tract 
of land from the State on Linebrook Road as a building site of a new elementary 
school. 

During the past year the Board held joint meetings with various town groups 
including the Building Code Committee, the Board of Health, the Salt Marsh Com- 
mittee, the Historic District Study Committee, and the Conservation Commission, 
to discuss various topics pertaining to the current and future development of the 
Town. 

The Board especially wants to thank the town engineer for his services. The 
Board relied upon his engineering advice in making decisions pertaining to sub- 
divisions in both the planning and development stages. 

IPSWICH CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Charles S. Hood, Chairman 

Twenty-four meetings were held during the year plus joint meetings with 
other boards and meetings outside of Ipswich. A representative from our Com- 
mission has attended many Salt Marsh Study Committee, Planning Board and 
Selectmen's meetings. 

We have supported several conservation bills at both the state and Federal 
level that may eventually benefit Ipswich. 

We reviewed the areas of pollution to see what progress had been made to 
alleviate existing problems. As a result of our findings a recommendation was 
made to the Selectmen on the sewering of that area we considered most critical. 
The area is bounded on the north by Market Street on the west by Topsfield Road, 
and on the east by the river. 

We attended Planning Board meetings to see what might be done to preserve 
our natural resources through zoning. We met with the Planning Consultant and 
our recommendations are incorporated in that part of the Master Plan that comes 
under our jurisdiction and will be the outline for future work of the Commission. 

We have studied published material and attended meetings concerned with 
the preservation of salt marshes. As a result of our findings an article will be 
inserted in the warrant which we hope will help preserve the marshes. 

Many months of work have gone into the study of present and future water 
supply sources for the town. Core borings, test borings, chemical analysis of 
water and other technical data has been gathered for us by state and federal agen- 
cies. Various town departments have aided us in gathering information for our 
study and our preliminary report has been presented to the Selectmen. 

A program has been set up with Scout Leaders so that the boy scouts can 
earn their conservation badges. They are at present performing a much needed 
service to the community by clearing brush at Bull Brook Basin. 



29 



We conferred with Mr. Tobias on a project at the pumping station where a 
new fish ladder for anadromous fish has been installed as part of a project to en- 
large the cooling pond. 

Our meetings are held the first Thursday of each month at 8 p.m. in the 
Town Hall and others as posted on the bulletin board at the Town Hall. 

SALT MARSH COMMITTEE 

Joan P. Cudhea, Chairman 

The purpose of this committee is "to study and promote acquisition and con- 
servation" of the salt marshes. 

The first 2000 copies of "The Ipswich Marshes" designed to explain the need 
for protection, was distributed in half a year, mainly at Town Meeting, at Town 
Hall, the Public Library, and at school nature classes; also to owners of salt 
marshes, visitors on 17th Century Day, conservation organizations, museums, 
and by request, to government agencies on all levels in several states. 

A secondprinting of 1800 copies was available in time for a statewide coastal 
wetlands conference on December 28, where 275 copies were taken by people all 
over the State. The pamphlet i s now available at the office of the Executive 
Secretary. 

The attempt to definitely determine the boundaries of the marsh which Ipswich 
already owns continues with the assistance of a part-time employee. This survey 
is useful not only in finding out present Town ownership, but in making a clearer 
picture of the jigsaw outline of the private owner ship --requisite knowledge for 
future recommendations. 

After considerable study, the Committee is recommending that owners of 
salt marsh donate a conservation easement (the right to fill, dredge, or build) 
to The Fund for Preservation of Wildlife and Natural Areas, which would in turn 
give the easement to the Town, with a reverter clause specifying that the title 
reverts to the fund if the conditions of the gift of easement are not upheld. 

Future activity of the Committee will be in part shaped by the Commonwealth 
program for protection of salt marshes. Details are avidly awaited, as the 
Commonwealth seeks protection for 45, 000 acres of "pasture" for the entire shell- 
fish industry and a great part of the commercial and sport fishing business of 
Massachusetts. 

IPSWICH HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Mr. George Mathey, Chairman 

The Ipswich Historical Commission, established by the Town Meeting of 1964, 
enjoys the distinction of being one of the first of such Commissions established 
in Massachusetts. 

It seems justifiable that Ipswich, the birthplace of American Independence, 
should be the leader in the program that now includes approximately fourteen 
other communities. 

The work of the Historical Commission has thus far been interesting and 
varied. We have answered all correspondence received by the town requesting 
information about Ipswich; its historical landmarks and sites, genealogical his- 
tories, homes and personages. We have received many requests for literature 

30 



from travel agencies which we have been able to supply through the kind coopera- 
tion of the Historical Society and the Chamber of Commerce. These letters have 
been received from all sections of the United States and it has been most gratifying 
to note the tremendous amount of interest that Ipswich holds for people and organi- 
zations all over the country. It is our distinct hope that in the future the Commis- 
sion, the town and the Chamber of Commerce will be able to work in closer 
relationship regarding the promotion of Ipswich as a historic and tourist attraction. 

At the request of Kevin H. White, Secretary of the Commonwealth and Chair- 
man of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, we have prepared and forwarded 
a list of all historic sites, markers and buildings owned by the town or county 
within Ipswich. This has been most helpful in compiling the inventory of historical 
assets of the Commonwealth. 

Although the Commission has been empowered to advertise, prepare, print 
and distribute books, maps, charts, plans and pamphlets deemed necessary for 
its proper function, unfortunately, as yet monies have not been appropriated to 
carry out this work. Representative John Dolan of Ipswich has filed House Bill 
No. 254 which wouldpermit the state to reimburse any city or town participating 
in the program. If strongly supported and passed, this bill will enable the His- 
torical Commission to more fully serve the interests of Ipswich as a whole. 

TOWN GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Francis X. Masse, Chairman 

During the year the Committee considered many minor variations to the 
existing Town Government form, while observing the operations of various de- 
partments as they now exist. Consideration was given early in the year to some 
consolidation of the various departments performing public services, but the de- 
cision was made to allow the government to stabilize and to gain more experience 
in each department's individual operation before recommending consolidation. 

The Committee proposed to the Board of Selectmen a By-law establishing a 
mandatory Electric Light Advisory Board and Water and Sewer Advisory Board, 
but the proposal was rejected by the Selectmen who objected to the mandatory 
nature of the By-law. These Advisory Boards were established by the Board of 
Selectmen for the current year on a voluntary basis. 

During the year a study was conducted on the operation of the Public Library, 
unusual in that the governing body is appointed through the terms of a trust fund 
that supplies only a minor portion of the operating expense of this facility, the 
major portion being paid by the Town which has no direct representation. Since 
the meetings of this Board of Trustees are held in private, the Board is subject 
to considerable criticism. At a meeting between the Library Board of Trustees 
and the Government Study Committee, the Board agreed to investigate the feasi- 
bility of altering the schedule of hours during which the library was open in an 
attempt to increase use of the facility, and to invite a representative of the Com- 
mittee to the Board meetings. The library later changed to a schedule in which 
it was open two nights a week. The Study Committee representative was invited 
to one Board meeting. 

At the approaching Annual Town Meeting, the Committee will request per- 
mission from the Town to petition the State Legislature for approval of a Repre- 
sentative Town Meeting Act for Ipswich, final acceptance of which will be decided 
by the voters of Ipswich at the polls following Legislative approval. This culminates 
an extensive study conducted by the Committee during which all towns in the 
Commonwealth currently operating on a Representative Town Meeting basis were 
contacted. The Committee is unanimous in its recommendation of the adoption of 

31 



such an act. Assuming a favorable vote is forthcoming from Town Meeting, the 
final draft of the act to be submitted to the Legislature will be prepared through 
a series of hearings to be held shortly after Town Meeting. The town has twice 
before shown interest in representative town meetings by establishing study com- 
mittees specifically on this subjectbefore the establishment of the Town Govern- 
ment Study Committee. 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

John G. Thatcher, Jr. , Chairman 

In March of 1964 the Board of Selectmen appointed George E. Taylor and John 
G. Thatcher, Jr. for three years, Arthur S. LeClair and Frank Snow for two 
years, and Armand R. Brouillette, town employee representative for one year. 
John G. Thatcher, Jr. was elected Chairman. 

During the year, the Board interviewed applicants for full time employment 
as follows: Meter Reader for Water Department, Truck Driver Laborer for 
Cemetery Department, First Class Lineman and Apprentice Lineman for Electric 
Light Department, Operator's Helper for Generation plant, Clerk for Accountant's 
Office, Roving Clerk for Town Hall, and a Recreation Director, plus seasonal help 
for Summer and part time help. All recommendations based on the applicant's 
qualifications, were forwarded to the Board of Selectmen or elected Commission- 
ers for their selection. 

The Personnel Board attended two appeal cases and sent recommendations 
to the Board of Selectmen and Department Head for their action. As the results of 
one appeal case that went to court, the Personnel Board's Secretary was sub- 
poenaed to court with its records. 

The Board reclassified the Electric Light Department Personnel upon re- 
quest of the Light Commissioners and final approval was given by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

On request of the Fire Department, overtime pay was clarified and final 
recommendations sent to the Board of Selectmen for their approval. 

Acting on request of the Town Employees Association, the Personnel Board 
has started to bring up to date the Personnel Rules and Regulations. 

The Personnel Boardparticipates as a member of the Massachusetts Munici- 
pal Personnel Boards' Association. This organization provides an excellent 
centralized source for obtaining information. The MMPBA distributes an annual 
report on wage surveys as well as bulletins pertaining to matters of interest to 
the membership. 

TRAFFIC STUDY COMMITTEE 

Clifton Wentworth, Chairman 

During 1964 the Traffic Study Committee held meetings with many interested 
citizens and business men. At one such meeting, the executive secretary went 
over the year's traffic maintenance program with the committee. The following 
recommendations emanated from this meeting: 

With the expected increase in traffic, an effective renewal and maintenance 
program of the traffic signs is recommended. At present, there are many signs 



32 



missing and many others are in such poor condition that they are illegible. To 
command the respect of the public, traffic signs should be placed at convenient 
places and be kept in good condition. 

The Traffic Study Committee is ever mindful of the tax dollar. We, therefore, 
recommend that this program be set up so that a section of the Town be brought 
up to date each year. At this time the Committee is checking into an inexpensive 
machine for making our own signs. This machine could save the town as much as 
one dollar on every sign needed. Five hundred dollars, appropriated in 1964, was 
far short of what was needed, and because of this deficiency, very little work was 
done. We recommend that in 1965, this appropriation be increased and a man 
from the highway department be appointed to work on maintenance and sign re- 
placement. 

It is recommended that the sum of $1500 be appropriated for the purpose of 
painting forty miles of center lines on town roads by outside contractors. 

For the business section, we recommend that the sum of $600 be appropriated 
for the painting of parking spaces and all crosswalks. We recommend that this 
painting be done before June 1, 1965 by the highway department. 

At this time, the traffic study committee is making a survey of the traffic 
signs in town and their condition. This information will be made available to the 
executive secretary as soon as it is compiled. 



33 



LIST OF JURORS 



These are the citizens who are eligible to be drawn for Jury Duty during 1965. 



Christopher Aloupis 
William V. Arsenault 
Chester S. Bartniski 
Gardner A. Bolles 
Peter Bonczar 
George H. Bouchard 
George Bouranis 
Kennard V. Damon 
Walter F. Dove 
Victor Drew, Jr. 
Henry W. Henderson 
Edward J. Marcorelle 
Eugene Matheson 
S. Harold Perley 
Frank J. O'Malley 
Charles A. Ring, Jr. 
Charles L. Rose 
Bernie E. Spencer 
Chester L. Stone 
F. Sigourney Todd 
Daniel S. Wendel 
William Samuel Weare 
Frank J. Wegzyn 
Richard S. Sheppard 



13 


Brown Square 


Draftsman 


14 


High Street 


Recreation Dept. 


15 


Second Street 


Sylvania 


12 


Woods Lane 


Auto Dealer 




Perley Avenue 


Retired 


31 


County Road 


Chemical Engr. 


12 


Warren Street 


Plastic Dept. 


13 


Topsfield Road 


Maintenance 




Jeffreys Neck Road 


Investigator 


10 


Dornell Road 


Fountain Manager 


45 


Topsfield Road 


Maintenance 




Lord Square 


Retired 


21 


North Main Street 


Retired 




Linebrook Road 


Semi-retired 


53 


East Street 


Retired 


15 


Labor in Vain Road 


Self-employed 




Jeffreys Neck Road 


Retired 


31 


County Road 


Retired 


47 


County Street 


Cemetery Dept. 


79 


Central Street 


Retired 




Jeffreys Neck Road 


Retired 


14 


Kimball Avenue 


Watchmaker 


67 


Linebrook Road 


Unemployed 


17 


Kimball Avenue 


Highway Dept. 



Citizens selected for Jury Duty in 1964. 



Earle B. Bamford 11 

James E. Carter 13 

Jerome Richardson 
John Thatcher, Jr. 17 

John H. Updike 26 

Mary A. Prescott 31 

Marjorie E. Preston 
William Wasserman, Jr. 



Elm Street 
Southern Heights 
County Road 
Upper River Road 
East Street 
Farley Avenue 
Lakeman's Lane 
Argilla Road 



Hayward Hosiery Co. 

Sylvania 

Wool buyer 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. 

Self-employed 

Housewife 

Reporter 

Self-employed 



34 



-Insert , ^fOijtf 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL Co/w 4 
TOWN MEETING ' I 

Essex ss. 

To the Constable of the Town 
of Ipswich in said County 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify 
the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Ipswich, qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to meet at the 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in — 

said Ipswich on _ TJ 

TUESDAY, THE EIGHTH "g £ 
DAY OF MARCH, 1966 \ 2. 

at 8:00 o'clock in the evening, o' Q. 
then and there to act on the fol- F" 
lowing articles, viz: _, -q 

Article 1 To see if the Town if" C 
will vote a sum of money for w 2! 
the purpose of constructing ex- J» o" 
tensions of the sanitary sewer 2- 
system to include all or part of c C 
the following streets: Market {5 CT 
Street, North Main Street, War- & 5 
ren Street and Loney's Lane, OT -* 
and to see what method the ^ 

Town will adopt to raise and ap- 
propriate such sum, by borrow- 
ing or otherwise. 

Article 2 To see if the Town 
will sell to Edward and Gene- 
vieve Kamon of Ipswich, a cer- 
tain parcel of land located on 
the Northwesterly side of Pine 
Swamp Road, more particular- 
ly described in a deed from Un- 
derbill to the Town of Ipswich 
dated May 3, 1895. 

Article 3 To see if the Town 
will vote to authorize the follow- 
ing By-Law: The removal of 
snow or other natural accumu- 
lation from private property in- 
to or upon an adjacent town 

street shaft-be prohibited. Any - 

person violating the provisions 
of this by-law may on convic- 
tion of such violation, be fined 
not more than $10.00 for each 
such offense. 

Article 4 To see if the Town 
will vote to request the Legisla- 
ture to enact a Selectman-Town 
Manager form of government 
for the Town of Ipswich. 

And you are directed to serve 
this warrant by posting up at- 
tested copies thereof, one at the 
Post Office, one at the Town 
House and one at each of the 
meeting houses and by publi- 
cation in a local newspaper at 
least seven days before the time 
of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 23rd 
day of February in the year of 
our Lord, One Thousand Nine 
Hundred Sixty Six. 

Board of Selectmen 
Ipswich, Massachusetts 
John A. Pechilis 
Brainard C. Wallace 
John R. Logan 
John S. Bialek 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 
December 31, 1964 



TOWN MODERATOR 
Joseph V. Riley 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
John A. Pechilis 
Nathaniel M. Quint 
John F. Conley 
Charles T. Passales 
Brainard C. Wallace 



TOWN CLERK 

Anthony A. Murawski 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 
Robert W. Burke 
Stanley E. Eustace 
Warren E. Grant, Sr. 
Jacqueline M. Hazen 
Richard J. Burke 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
George J. Geanakos 
James D. Smyth 
William C. Wigglesworth, M. D. 
Rev. F. G. Sherrill 
Frank J. Amaro 
Nancy L. Thompson 
Edwin Damon, Jr. 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Glenfred A. Wanzer 
Stanley E. Eustace 
Christopher Karras 
Donald C. Hazen 
John G. Thatcher, Jr. 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Seward S. Tyler 
David B. Claxton 
Charles W. Pickard 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Charles L. Rose 
Edna W. Graffum 
H. Ernest Stone 



CONSTABLES 

Boley S. Radzinski 
Bernie E. Spencer 

PARK COMMISSIONERS 
Richard J. Burke 
Stanley E. Eustace 
Jacqueline M. Hazen 

TREASURER -COLLECTOR 
George C. Mourikas 

CLAM COMMISSIONER 
Arthur N. Moon 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Daniel B. Lunt 
Timothy F. Carey, Jr. 
Richard W. Davis 
Frederick D. Vincent, Jr. 
William Markos 
Anthony J. Klos 
Thomas Diggins 
Theodore Lucas 
Kenneth Mc Mull en 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
Lawrence M. King 
Frank L. Collins, M. D. 
Norman L. Quint 

PLANNING BOARD 
John P. Logan 
Gilman H. Nichols, Jr. 
Paul D. Keenan 
Paul J. McGinley 
Char le s Lamp s on 



TREE WARDEN 

Armand Michaud 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
Gordon C. Player 
Chester L. Stone 
Raymond Barrows 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUND 
Charles E. Goodhue 
Edward J. Marcorelle 
Edward Kelleher 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Charles S. Hood 
Carroll B. Hills 
Frederick Jenkins 
Costas Tsoutsouras 
Edward T. Antkowiak 
Jacob M. Israelsohn 
Marie B. Ladd 



35 



' ' 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
William H. Davis 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 
James Theodosopoulos 
Arthur Marsh 
Julius Kaszuba 

Thomas Gregory, Jr. , Assoc. Mbr. 
Peter A. Johnson, Assoc. Mbr. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Barbara A. Emberley 
Chester A. Patch, Jr. 
Alice E. Keenan 
Katherine S. Thompson 
George R. Mathey 
Sidney N. Shurcliffe 
Charles E. Goodhue, Jr. 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Francis X. Masse 
Betty S. Cole 
Wayne E. Eustace 
Frank W. Rygielski 
Donna P. Smith 
Peter S. Szynal 
Phillip Viladenis 
Frederick Jenkins 



SALT MARSH COMMITTEE 
Joan P. Cudhea 
Chester J. Patch, Jr. 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Helen K. Lunt 
Arthur N. Moon 
Donna P. Smith 
Is adore L. L. Smith 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

John T. Thatcher, Jr. 
George E. Taylor 
Arthur S. LeClair 
Armand Brouillette 
Frank Snow 

BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 
George R. Mathey 
Euclid A. Beaulieu 
Stanley M. Bennett 
John C. Goot 
William L. Thoen 

MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMITTEE 
Alice Keenan 
Philip Abel 
Philip Demar 
Marjorie Davis 
Thelma Carey 
Stanley Hood 
Norbert White 



TRAFFIC STUDY COMMITTEE 
Clifton L. Wentworth 
James Williams 
Eleanor W. Perkins 
A. Richard Marc-Aurele 
Howard R. Hills 
Philip Abell 
Paul P. Badger 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Anthony A. Murawski 
John A. Kobos 
Henry F. Hills 
James Lampropoulos 



SEWAGE & WATER ADVISORY BOARD 
Paul Keenan 
Charles O. Tremblay 
Edward Wegzyn 
Donald Hazen 
Stanley Trocki 



36 



WM MEM©1IAM 






George C. Parsons 
Trust Fund Commissioner 
February 25, 1964 



James Austin 
Finance Committee 
March 15, 1964 



Henry Goody 

Water Department 

June 16, 1964 







Hildred Kelleher 

Welfare Department 

May 14, 1964 



Fred Rodzen 
Electric Light Department 
July 8, 1964 



James Stewart 

Cemetery Department 

August 16, 1964 





Lawrence Adams 
Fire Department 
September 21, 1964 



George Hovey 
Welfare Department 
November 23, 1964 



Dennison Wallace 

Former Town Accountant 

January 3, 1964 



37 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1964 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Mr* George Geanakos, Chairman 

Mr, James Smyth 

Dr. William Wiggle sworth 

Mr. Frank Amaro 

Mrs* Nancy Thompson 

Rev. F. Goldthwaite Sherrill 

Mr. Edwin Damon, Jr. 



TERM EXPIRES 

1965 
1965 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1967 
1967 



Meetings of the School Committee are held on the first and third Thursdays of 
the month at the Office of the Superintendent of Schools in the Tyler Build- 
ing, 2 Central Street, Ipswich, Massachusetts at 8 o'clock. 



RODNEY R. WOOD - SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



ADMINISTRATION OFFICE- 



'S Central Street 



OFFICE HOURS- 



•8-4:30 and by appointment 



Summer Schedule Arranged 
38 






REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



TO THE CITIZENS OF IPSWICH : 

The annual report of the Superintendent of Schools is divided into six 
major sections: 

1. The Superintendent's Report 

2. The Report of the High School Principal 

3. The Report of the Junior High School Principal 

4. The Report of the Intermediate School Principal 
5» The Report of the Primary School Principal 

6. Statistics 

The reports of the several school principals present the organization and 
functions of the several schools. System-wide accomplishments, projects, and 
emphases are reported by the Superintendent* The official school financial and 
pupil-enrollment figures are tabulated in the section called "Statistics." 

This year the School Committee is pleased to list some of the outstand- 
ing educational achievements of the last ten years. 

A DECADE OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS 



1954 - 1964 

SECTION I . SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND PHYSICAL PLANT 

Winthrop School Voted 1954 

Annex Building Remodelled i960 

General Up-grading of Buildings and Grounds 1960-1964 

New High School Voted 1962 

Marshland Donations 1963 

New Elementary School Voted 1964 

SECTION II . CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 

A. ELEMENTARY : 

Special Classes for Educable Pupils Organized 

Foreign Language introduced into the Elementary 
Schools 

Reading Program strengthened 

Organized Phonics Instruction introduced 

'New' Arithmetic Program introduced 

Social Studies Content revised 

Nature Study and Conservation Program introduced 

Special Classes for Trainable Pupils organized 

B. SECONDARY : 

Extended Foreign Languages 
Advanced Composition Courses introduced 
Advanced Mathematics courses introduced 
Work Experience Program introduced 
Electronics Curriculum introduced 



1958 

I960 
1961 
1961 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1964 



I960 
1961 
1961 
1961 
1962 



39 



Expanded Business Curriculum 1962 

Advanced Science Courses introduced 1963 

Expanded Extra-Curricular program 1964 

C. Summer School Organized for Elementary-Secondary 

Pupils 1958 

D* Adult Education Classes Organized 1961-1962 for 

Vocational Use, Enriobment , and High School 

Diplomas • 

SECTION III . RELATED ACHIEVEMENTS : 

Establishment of High and Junior High School 

Libraries 1959-1963 

Establishment of Curriculum Departments 1961 

High School Accreditation 1962 

Expanded Guidance Services 1963 

Expanded Health Services 1964 

Number of Teachers with Advanced Degrees and Train- 
ing doubled 1964 

Establishment of Centralized Elementary Libraries 1964 

School Committee adherence to the concept of con- 
tinuous progress and evolution of that progress 1954-1964 

Ipswich citizens may be justly proud of the concrete advances in the field 
of education listed above* These achievements have been made possible by the 
many School Committees, Study Committees, Building Committees, Governmental 
Groups, School Personnel and Individual Citizens* The decade ahead holds 
promise for continued progress* 

It is pleasant to thank those town departments who have contributed much 
to the health and safety of the pupils on their way to school and in their 
school buildings* The young people of Ipswich enjoy an informal priority in 
the minds of service clubs, and other private organizations who greatly en- 
courage them along the path through school and to advanced study after grad- 
uation* This governmental and private cooperation supplements the work of the 
teacher and advances the achievement of the pupil* 

RODNEY R. WOOD 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 






40 



REPORT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS : 

ORGANIZATION ; No major change in the organizational plan has been made. 
A minor revision provided a short homeroom period at the beginning of the day 
to enable certain student activities to meet on a more scheduled and program- 
ized basis. Many of the recommendations made by the recent Willis report are 
already in practice in the high school* 

Our school day is a six and one-half hour day, the school 
year is 183 days. This is very much in keeping with suggested policy. A three- 
track program, College Preparatory, Business, and Technical is operated with 
pupil ability groups in each track. This grouping permits pupils to progress 
at a rapid rate and assures higher achievement. 

Classes in enrichment and remedial work are offered to oar 
students during the summer for six weeks. Adult evening classes are open to 
those interested in receiving a diploma or those who desire additional tech- 
nical or academic background. 

CURRICULUM : Constant curriculum inspection and revision is necessary 
to keep abreast of demands from colleges and businesses. This year, General 
Science was dropped from the Freshman level and Biology was introduced. Some 
College Preparation freshmen may now take Physics which was once reserved for 
the Junior or Senior year. Our college preparation program still seems to be 
attracting a vast majority of our students. 

Special enrichment programs are offered in Science througi 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Calculus, English, through Survey of World Literature 
and Advanced Composition. 

TEACHING PERSONNEL : There are presently thirty-nine members on the High 
School staff, twenty-two posses Master's Degrees and of these twenty-two tea- 
chers, five have thirty hours of professional training beyond their Masters 
Degree., The average number of years of experience among the staff is ten. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL: The student population of the high school is: 



Freshmen 


Boys 
Girls 


71 
75 


146 


Sophomores 


Boys 
Girls 


88 
72 


160 


Juniors 


Boys 
Girls 


67 
60 


127 


Seniors 


Boys 
Girls 


72 
71 


JA3 



TOTAL 576 

Last year's graduating class consisted of one hundred and twenty students; of 
this number 28% entered four-year colleges, 6% went to two-year colleges, 7% 
sought a nursing career and 28% matriculated to some form of post-secondary 
education, (business, the military, or were married.) 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS : Regular and preventative maintenance was taking 
place throughout the year with special emphasis given to the relocation of the 
football field from the junior high school to the high school. 

JOSEPH R. ROGERS, PRINCIPAL 



41 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS ; 

ORGANIZATION ; The Junior High School is a three-year school composed of 
grades six, seven and eight. Enrollment figures for October 1, 196*t were: 

Grade Girls Boys Total 



6 83 103 186 

7 88 96 l8*f 

8 76 59 135 
2*t7 25S 505 

The school day is from 8:00 a.m., to 2:30 p.m. There are 
six fifty-minute periods and a thirty-five minute homeroom activity period 
each day. Lunch is served in two sittings at thirty minutes each. Pupils are 
allowed three minutes for passing between classes and this makes for a school 
day of six and one-half hours. 

In grades. six and seven there are six sections, in grade 
eight there are five sections. All pupils in grades six, seven and eight are 
assigned to sections according to their achievement and their potential. The 
seventh and eighth grades organization is departmental, while the sixth grade 
is partly self-contained and partly departmental. 

CURRICULUM : The following subjects are pursued by all students in the 
Junior High School: 

Subject Subject 

English Practical Arts (7th & 8th grades only) 

Social Studies Physical Education 

Mathematics Library 

Science Audubon-Nature Study (6th grade only) 

French Current Events 

Art 

Music 

TEACHING PERSONNEL : The Junior High School staff includes a total of 21 
full-time teachers and 7 part-time teachers. Of the total, 18 are men and 10 
are women. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL : During the year, standardized tests were administered 
to all pupils. The Iowa Test of Basic Skill was administered in the fall. 
School activities include student council, dramatic club, instrumental band, 
mixed chorus, library assistants club, a chess club, an intramural athletic 
council and a cheerleading corps. The full program of athletic activities, 
both on an intramural and intrascholastic basis, instituted in the fall of 
1963, has been enthusiastically received by students. The junior high school 
has a uniformed football team which plays a five-game schedule, and a basket- 
ball and baseball team that has a ten-game schedule. The girls have a ten-game 
schedule for basketball and baseball. The late bus run instituted last year 
to encourage more pupils to attend the afternoon school sports and school ac- 
tivities has proven very successful. 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS : A planned program of building maintenance has been 
maintained since the building has been functioning on a full-time basis as a 
junior high school. 

BERTRAM H. BENNETT, PRINCIPAL 



42 



REPORT OF THE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS : 

ORGANIZATION ; The Winthrop school houses all of grades four and five and 
one third grade. The staff includes a principal, a part-time assistant, six- 
teen full-time teachers and several part-time specialists. A secretary, two 
custodians, lunchroom employees and a nurse complete the staff. Grade five 
is departmentalizing in the areas of Arithmetic and Language Arts. Two tea- 
chers* Aides supervise the childrens 1 lunch and recess period. 

The school day, including a forty-minute lunch period is 
six and one-half hours in length. More than fifty percent of the school 
population is transported by bus. 

CURRICULUM ; Major and minor subjects are scheduled by weekly time allot- 
ments. The addition of a specialist in the areas of Art and Physical Educa- 
tion has refined these important areas. A qualified teacher gives instruction 
in French to all pupils in grades four and five. All pupils participate in a 
regular program of physical education and fitness. 

The Educational TV has become an integral part of our cur- 
riculum rather than a mere supplement. Science and Social Studies programs 
as well as conversational French are viewed on a regular basis with pre- 
viewing preparation and post-viewing evaluation taking place in the classroom 
under teacher guidance. 

Several teachers participated in a Workshop in Social Stud- 
ies. This has had some impact on the Social Studies curriculum. A new science 
program in grades four and five was introduced this year. Some new texts and 
materials are being tried out. Study committees in these areas are continu- 
ing and additional in-service workshops are planned or are in process. 

Technological and social change and/or advance necessitate 
a constant evaluation and re-appraisal of all curriculum areas. 

Under the sponsorship of the P.T.A., the school library is 
being completely catalogued in the Dewey Decimal System. A group of volun- 
teers provide daily library service for the school, as well as repairing and 
cataloguing service. A very successful Book Fair provided for parents and 
children the opportunity to add to their own libraries, and, the proceeds 
from the Fair increased the number of volumes available for borrowing. 

Planned heterogeneity is the basis for grouping in all the 
classes of all grades thus providing a range of abilities in each class. In 
grade five (and to a limited extent in grade four) children are re-grouped 
for mathematics and instructional reading. 

A five-week summer session in reading and mathematics for 
pupils from grades three to five was well attended. A program in instrumen- 
tal music was also offered. 

TEACHING PERSONNEL: The Winthrop School faculty consists of twenty-one 
teachers, sixteen full-time and five part-time. One teacher serves as a part- 
time assistant principal. Seven teachers are new to the school system. Nine 
teachers are Ipswich residents. Five teachers hold the master's degree and 
five teachers have matriculated for advanced study. The French teacher has 
been the recipient of the N.D.E.X. scholarship for advanced study in French. 
All teachers are engaged in some post-graduate study, either in-service edu- 
cation or special fields of interest at colleges or universities in the area. 

Several teachers from a neighboring college had 
their supervised practice teaching in this school during both the spring and 
fall term. 



43 



PUPIL PERSONNEL : The Iowa Tests and Basic Skills was administered again 
this year to all grades* After due consideration these tests were adminis- 
tered in the fall rather than in the spring* Various commercial and teacher 
constructed reading and arithmetic tests are used as needed* Mental Maturity 
tests are given at the end of the third grade* Visual, auditory and dental ex- 
aminations are administered during the year and all pupils in grade four re- 
ceive a routine physical examination* Health records on all pupils are kept 
by the school nurse* 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS : A regular schedule of building maintenance is 
followed* Twelve classrooms are painted during the year* All rooms received 
needed repairs and replacements* Blackout curtains were installed in the 
Ail-Purpose Room and Cafetorium, so that better use could be made of these 
areas for film and television viewing* One new television set was added* 

MARY M. EVANS, PRINCIPAL 



REPORT OF THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS PRINCIPAL 

TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS : 

ORGANIZATION : During the school year 196*f the primary grades were all 
housed in the seventeen regular classrooms of the Burley and Shatswell 
Schools* The Shatswell School also used the Gymnasium and lunchroom-kitchen 
facilities of the Ascension Memorial Church Parish House during the entire 
year* In September the four third grades again returned to the classrooms 
of the Parish House to make room at the Winthrop School for grades four and 
five* A new addition this year has been a Trainable Special Class for ser- 
iously retarded children* This has been housed in the Parish House* It is 
hoped that with the opening of the new elementary school on Linebrook Road 
in September that we will not again require the use of the Ascension Memorial 
Church* The combined enrollment of the Primary Schools in October was 5^8 
pupils with 201 at the Burley School, 2^3 at the Shatswell School and 104 at 
the Parish House* 

CURRICULUM : Continued work in the area of modern mathematics has lent 
to strengthen the curriculum in this important area* The elementary curricu- 
lum committee and teachers have made revisions in the handwriting program, 
revised reading level tests, and have explored the areas of improvement in 
the social studies and science areas* 

TEACHING PERSONNEL : A staff of twenty-two regular classroom teachers 
are supplemented and assisted by a consultant staff consisting of experts in 
the areas of reading, art, music, speech and physical education* The school 
nurse and an adjustment counsellor are available also. Most primary teachers 
have continued their studies during the year and several will be awarded the 
Master degree soon* There were no retirements during the year and seven new 
members joined the staff in September* (One new position and six replace- 
ments*) 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS : Continued preventive maintenance in both build- 
ings have kept them in excellent repair. New storm windows were added to the 
first floor of the Burley School and a re-arrangement of interior space has 
provided room in the basement for the physical education program* At the 
Shatswell School, during the Christmas va c ation one of the boilers which had 
been condemned was removed which provided additional room for supplies and 
materials* Further changes are planned for the Shatswell School basement in 
order to convert it into a lunch room so that lunch would be served in the 
school building, and we will no longer use the facilities of the Ascension 
Memorial Church* 

SPECIAL ! During the spring and summer months a great deal of work was 
accomplished in regionalizing our Special Class and establishing for the first 

44 



time a class for the mentally retarded trainable children. This class has 
only eight members, but each child requires special assistance in making max- 
imum use of his educational ability. The establishment of these two Special 
Classes on a regional basis represents a step forward in providing facilities 
for mentally retarded children. The cost of the program on a tuition basis is 
shared by the participating communities. At the present time students from 
Essex, Rowley, Hamilton, Manchester, and one from Newburyport are attending 
classes with our Ipswich children. 

As in other years, a series of four Wednesday morning sessions were held 
with the parents of first grade children to acquaint them with the problems 
of beginning school and the school curriculum. This met with the usual suc- 
cess and was well attended. 



WILLIAM E. WAITT, JR., PRINCIPAL 



45 



IPSWICH HIGH GRADUATES 196*f 



Hazel Jane Atkinson 
Rita Louise Balboni 
Pamela Anne Baldwin 
Cynthia Rae Barrows 
William Edward Barney, Jr» 
James Francis Bourque 
Ronald Paul Beauregard 
David Clive Beckingham 
Barbara Ann Benjamin 
Elmer Garland Bernard 
Eleanor Joyce Bilodeau 
Susan J. Bowman 
Kelly Jean Britton 
♦Donna Jeanne Brown 
Jean Lynn Burridge 
Bonita Clare Campbell 
Jack Hull Carter 
Robin Charles Carter 
Mary Elizabeth Caverly 
♦♦Sandra Mae Chamberlain 
Carole Ann Ciolek 
James Edwin Co^e 
Patricia Lee Comeau 
Christopher John Conley 
James Brian Connolly 
Edward C. Cooke 
Ann Coulouras 
James Alan Courage 
Geraldine Elizabeth Cummings 
Bruce Crane Cutler 
Lois Evelyn DeMario 
Susanne Ruth Dempsey 
John Arthur DePaola 
Patricia Ann Douglas 
Lawrence Earl Drown 
Robert Edward Dudek 
Joanne H. Dziadul 
Suzanne Dziadul 
Cynthia Anne Faulconer 
Carol Joan Feener 
Theodore Peter Frydrych 
Judith C. Galusha 
Christopher Gianakas 
Janet Elizabeth Gerry 
Helen Patricia Girard 
Robert Donald Graffum 
Judith Grant 
Sharon Frances Grant 
Susan Louise Grant 
John War man Graves 
Arthur James Grimes, III 
Robert William Gustavson, Jr, 
Peter Charles Hoffman 
Ronald Ernest Hopping 
Harry L. Howarth 



Mary Elizabeth Jaslowich 
Lee Hamilton Jewett 
Natalie Towne Jewett 
Mary Dianne Jodoin 
Joyce Anne Klinger 
Donna Rae Knowlton 
Patricia Ann Koziol 
Elizabeth Jane Krakowski 
Peter James Lampropoulos 
James A* Lavoie 
Patricia Ann LeClair 
Richard Robert Lensky 
Elizabeth Ann Lewis 
Sandra Kay Lezon 
Kathleen Jane MacKay 

♦♦Donna E. Mackey 

♦♦Patricia Ann Matous 
Tobias W. McGregor 
George L. Medding 
Joseph Paul Monko, Jr. 
Linda Jane Moon 
Howard Steven Naugle 
Daniel Andrew Nikas 
Charles Frederick Norton 
Charles Dummer Noyes, Jr* 
Robert James Ostrega 
Donald A» Parker 
Raymond F« Pierce 
James Phillip Poirier 
Robert Stanley Price 
Jane A* Rathe 
Conrad Alan Ray, II 
Patricia Ann Reynolds 
Richard D» Rogers 
Maurice Arthur Rousseau, III 
Madeline Sanchez Ma 
Marcia C. Scibisz 
Harry D. Sheppard 
Peter Thompson Sheppard 
Sarah Swift Sherman 
David Paul Sklarz 
Cynthia Astrid Snow 
James J. Sotiropoulos 
Marie E. Stone 
Patricia R, Stone 
Nancy Jane Stout 
Michael Edward Sullivan 
Wanda Monica Surowiec 
Charles Dodge Surpitski 
Carolyn Jane Tedford 
James Vincent Terrio 
Linda Doreen Tillson 
George J. Tougas 
Lawrence John Tremblay 






46 



Denis Henry Trudel 
Ann Marie Tullercash 
Dirk Jan Peter Visser, IV 
Susan Gail Wade 
Judith Ann Waitonis 



John Joseph Waz 
Lynda Jeanne Whitney 
♦♦Patricia Marie Whynock 
Richard Barry Wile 
Robert R. Wile 
A* Wesley Winters, Jr. 



♦ Students who have maintained an average of &5% or over for four years. 
*♦ Students with an average of &5% or over for four years and also members 
of the National Honor Society. 



47 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY SCHOOL AND GRADE 





Enrollment - October 1, 


1964 








GRADE 1 


2 3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 9 


10 11 


12 


Total 


Burley 90 


81 30 














201 


Shat swell 104 


97 122 














323 


Sp. Class 9 
















9 


Winthrop 


30 


170 


183 










383 


Jr. High 






186 


184 13I> 






505 


Sr. High 










146 


161 129 


144 


580 


P. G.'s 














5 


5 


203 


173 i'82 


170 


183 186 


18f 135 146 


161 129 


l*f9 


2006 




ENROLLMENT 


CHART BY 


GRADES 


1959-1964 


(■ 






GRADE 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1965 


1964 






1 


171 


177 


167 


163 


192 


203 






2 


175 


159 


166 


161 


174 


178 






3 


137 


169 


158 


168 


166 


182 






4 


143 


134 


177 


165 


179 


170 






5 


140 


128 


126 


179 


182 


183 






6 


139 


135 


135 


130 


180 


186 






7 


137 


132 


134 


126 


127 


184 






8 


135 


147 


133 


143 


134 


135 






9 


122 


143 


158 


146 


165 


146 






10 


95 


107 


137 


174 


133 


161 






11 


102 


81 


106 


116 


166 


129 






12 


67 


105 


73 


94 


117 


149 






Spec* Class 


7 


6 


11 


7 


12 


5 








1570 


1523 


T5HT 


17^2 


1927 


20lT 








DISTRIBUTION OF MINORS -OCTOBER 1, 1964 






GIRLS 






Age 5-7 


7-16 






TOTAL 


Not enrolled in 


any school 






106 








106 


Private School in Town (St 


•Stanislaus) 


18 


76 






94 


Other Private 










27 






27 


Special Schools 


(State) 



















Vocational Schools 



















Public Schools 








113 
2^7 


729 
3?2 






842 
1059 


BOYS 






Age 5-7 


7-16 






TOTAL 


Not enrolled in 


any school 






91 








91 


Private School in Town (St 


•Stanislaus) 


26 


68 






94 


Other Private 








2 


17 






19 


Special Schools 


(State) 



















Vocational Schools 








3 






3 


Public Schools 








105 
225 


773 
SoT 






878 
Too'5 




EMPLOYMENT 


CERTIFICATES ISSUED TO MINORS- 


1964 




TOTAL 








AGE 14-16 


16- 


18 


Boys 








3 


32 




35 


Girls 








4 
7 


30 
oT 




34 
59 








HO SCHOOL 


SIGNAL 








j 






6:55 


A.M. No 


school, 


all schools, all day 








7:55 


A.M. No 


school 


(elementary) 







48 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT EXPENDITURES - PUBLIC SCHOOLS 







1962 


, 1963 


, 1964 






Expense 


Expense 


Expense 


f. 


GENERAL CONTROL 


$ 22,433^00 


i 27,879.73 


i 30,977.77 


ii. 


EXPENSE OF INSTRUCTION 


510,032.26 


") 564,624.15 






A. Teachers Salaries 


631,760.14 




B. Texts and Supplies 


27,240,28 


36,807.94 


43,730.88 




C. In-Service 


639.74 


800.27 


846.63 




D. Clerical and Other 


12,903.72 


13,266.39 


12,695.39 


in. 


PLANT OPERATION 










A. Custodial Salaries 


33,758.00 


47,532.13 


53,275.28 




B. Custodial Supplies 


4,600.00 


5,844.65 


6,000.19 




C. Electricity, Gas, Water 


7,145.00 


8,652.40 


17,644.61 




D. Fuel 


10,340.00 


8,740.78 


16,198.70 




E. Sewerage 


100.00 


148.15 


153.42 


IV. 


MAINTENANCE & REPAIR 


11,975.00 


13,106.92 


14,360.28 


v. 


AUXILIARY AGENCIES 


9,023.69 


8,810.08 






A. Health 


9,806.98 




B. Adult Education and 


■ t - 








Vocational Tuition 


2,475.06 


5,107.97 


2,671.70, 




C. Misc., - Printing, 










Express , Graduation , 


, 








Meetings 


1,448.40 


1,912.92 


1,551.18 




D. Insurance 


5,048.64 


4,506.32 


8,103.04 




E. Transportation 


42,920.70 


48,653.54 


72,577.54 




F. Americanization 






100.00 




G. Cafeteria 


5,4=1.36 


9,260.85 


11,253.41 




H. Library Supplies 


5,124.33 


7,854.06 


671.30 




I. Summer School 


5,722.82 


5,877.00 


5,812.28 




J. Speech 






1,300.00 




K. Teachers' Aides 






4,368.00 


VI. 


OUTLAY 


12,218.00 


2,019.56 


12,232.79 


VII. 


ATHLETICS 


8,416.72 


10,963.84 


11,496.66 


fill. 


SCHOOL BUDGET RETURNED 
TO REVENUE 

ATHLETIC FUND RETURNED TO 






35.38 


IX. 




T 




REVENUE 


.28 


.16 


3,32 






S738, 907,00 


$832,663.1$ 


*$6$,626!8? 


FEOFFEES x $5 « OOO • 00 


Expended 


for Education 


S 5,000.00 




REPORT ON 


PUBLIC LAW-TITLE III 




Public 


Law #874 January 1, 1964 




$ 66.09 




Grants 


PL #864-874 




5,098.27 
$5|i64.36 




General Education Expense 




2,207.43 






Balance 


1/1/65 


•*!»*.» 





49 



REIMBURSEMENTS TO THE TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1963 196*» ' 1965 (Estimated) 

Chapter 70 $ 80,397*53 $ 80,852.53 $ 9^,692.16 

Chapter 69-71 4,383*57 5*366.00 5.000.00 

Vocational Education 1.5^2.25 1,733.97 1,73^.00 

Tuition 1,7^0.00 3,2^5.00 9*000.00 

Driver Education 578.00 1.068.00 1,068.00 

Transportation 30,3^7*78 53,795.11 53,800.00 

Youth Service Board 4,500.00 4,500.00 4,500.00 

$123,489*13 $150,560.61 $169,79^.16 






50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

For the Town of 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Year Ending December 31, 1964- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1964 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & RESERVE 



Cash: 


Guarantee Deposits : 




Bank 441,409.68 


Municipal Light 


16,292.13 


Treasury Bills 298,390.00 


Performance Bond 


600.00 ' 


Certificate of 




16,892.13 


Deposit 100,000.00 


A^rencv: 




839,799.68 


Federal Withholding 


13,657.75 


Accounts Receivable: 


State Withholding 


1,930.73 


Taxes : 


Retirement 


2,825.89 


Levy of 1961 


Blue Cross 


15.3S 


Personal Property 1,093.50 




18,429.75 


Levy of 1962 


Tailings: 




Poll 48.00 


Unclaimed Checks 


3,266.08 


Real Estate (4.13) 






Levy of 1963 


Gifts & Bequests: 




Poll 74.00 


School Band Fund 


221.57 


Personal Property 122.50 


Cemeterv Perpetual Care 525.00 


Real Estate 9,398.39 




746.57 


Levy of 1964 


Federal Grants: 




Personal Property 6,815.00 


Disability Assistanc 


e 


Real Estate 153,740.70 


Administrat ion 


22.42 


171,287.96 


Assistance 


11,060.29 


Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise: 


Aid to Dependent Children 


Levy of 1961 865.13 


Administration 


115.30 


Levy of 1962 1,764.17 


Assistance 


4,529.62 


Levy of 1963 1,932.65 


Old Age Assistance 




Levy of 1964 10 r 905.41 


Administration 


173.17 


15,467.36 


Assistance 


16,291.43 


Farm Animal Excise: 


Medical Aid to Aged 




Levy of 1962 10.00 


Assistance 


12,207.84 


Levy of 1963 15.00 


School : 




Levy of 1964 24,28 


Public Law 81-874 


1,451.49 


49.38 


Public Law 85-864 


1,505.44 


Special Assessment: 




47,357.00 


Sewer : 






Unapport ioned 47 , 056 . 32 


Disabilitv Assistance Recoveries 214.80 


Added to Taxes 






Levy of 1963 163.88 


Revolving Fund 




Levy of 1964 1,526.42 


School Athletics 


2,711.77 


Committed Interest 






Levy of 1963 83.65 


ArroroDriation Balances 


• 


Lew of 196A l f 272.33 


Revenue: 




50,102.60 


General 


85,227.23 


Tax Title & Possessions: 


Municipal Light: 




Tax Titles 3,632.53 


Maint. & Oper. 


60,351.29 


Tax Title 


Depreciation 


105,160.71 


Possession 6 r 360.14 


Construction 


17,901.17 


9,992.67 


Non Revenue: 






Sewer Construction 


22,540.4S 




School Const. 


290,136.59 




Water : 






Extensions 


38,879.55 




Improvement Prog. 


4, 057,3$ 



624,254.87 



F-l 



BALANCE SHEET (Cont.) 



Accounts Receivable (Cont« ) 



Departmental : 
Police 
Ambulance 
Moth 
Health 
Highway 

Highway Machinery 
A.D.C. 
O.A.A. 

Public Welfare 
Veterans Services 
Education 
Cemetery 



Municipal Light: 
Rates & Charges 



83 .46 

1,242.00 

16.48 

362.14 

215.05 

154.87 
2,901.36 

348.03 

118.00 
9,558.36 
1,960.00 

1,161,90 

18,121.65 



Water: 
Liens Added to Taxes 

Levy of 1962 

Levy of 1963 

Levy of 1964 
Rates & Charges 



Sewer: 
Rental 

Aid to Highways: 
State 
County 



Loans Authorized 
Sewer 



5.30 

429.33 

6,170.11 

33 r 381,00 

39,985.74 



1,021.43 



32,164.33 
r?.8?2.l6 

47,996.49 



304,500.00 



Unprovided For or Overdrawn Accounts 
Underestimate 1964 Assessments 

County Tax 921.05 
Overlay 1964 4,660.88 
School Cafeteria 178.01 
World War II Mem. 159.63 
Adult Education Cla ss 39.00 

5,958.57 



Deficit 
Water 



27,37 9. 42 

1,590,435.74 



Loans Authorized & Unissued 304,500.00 

501.95 



Overestimate 1964 

State Parks & Reservations 



Special Funds : 

Sale of Real Estate 4,611.54 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 2,657.95 
Conservation 217.00 

7,486.49 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriations : 
Sewer 25,270.51 

Road Machinery 80.00 

Library 2 r 136.00 

27,486.51 



58,772.79 Overlay Surplus 



2,441.45 



Overlays Reserved for Abatements : 
Levy of 1961 1,093.50 
Levy of 1962 818.53 

Levy of 1963 l.?5Q.$0 

3,262.63 

R9?9PU9 Reserved Until Coulee-tod* 
Motor Vehicle & 

Trailer Excise 15,467.36 
Farm Animal Excise 49.38 

Sewer Assessment 51,124.03 

Tax Title & Possession9,992.67 
Departmental 18,121.65 

Municipal Light 58,772.79 

Water 39,985.74 

Aid to Highways 47 r 996.49 

241,510.11 



Surplus Revenue 
General 



289,373.63 



1,590,435.74 



F-2 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1964 
DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 
Inside Debt Limit 
General 

Outside Debt Limit 
General 

Municipal Light 
Water 



3*4,500.00 



2,105,000.00 
329,000.00 
611,500.00 



Serial Loans 

Inside Debt Limit 
General : 
Elem. School 
Municipal Garage 
Sewer Const. 
Sewer Treatment 
Plant 



Outside Debt Limit 
General : 
Sewer Const. 
Schools 
Elementary 
Intermediate 
High 



220,000.00 

4,000.00 

127,500.00 

33 f OOO.OO 

384,500.00 



3,430,000.00 



514,000.00 

608,000.00 
345,000.00 
638,000.00 

2,105,000.00 



Public Service Enterprise 
Municipal Light 329,000.00 
Water 6ll f 500.00 

9A0 r 500.00 
3,430,000.00 



BALANCE SHEET - DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Apportioned Assessment Not Due Account 
Sewer 69,895.65 



Apportioned Sewer Revenue 



69,895.65 



Due 1965 


5,450.18 


1966 


5,450.18 


1967 


5,450.18 


1968 


5,109.62 


1969 


4,989.38 


1970 


4,860.25 


1971 


4,149.05 


1972 


4,017.92 


1973 


3,404.45 


1974 


3,028.63 


1975 


3,028.63 


1976 


3,004.63 


1977 


3,004.63 


1978 


3,004.63 


1979 


3,004.63 


1980 


3,004.23 


1981 


2,589.56 


1982 


2,560.00 


1983 


784.87 



69,895.65 



BALANCE SHEET - DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 

Suspended Assessments Revenue 



Suspended Assessment Not Due Account 
Sewer 1.220.40 

l f 220.Z0 



X.220,40 
1.320.40 



F-3 



BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1964 
TRUSTS AND INVESTMENT FUNDS 



Trust and Investment Funds 
Cash and Securities 
In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Trustees 



In Custodv of Treasurer: 




Animal Fund 




203,680.60 Mrs, William G. Brown 


3,104.52 


189,828.59 School Funds: 




Eunice C. Cowles 


10,345.16 


Mark Newman 


5,978.94 


Marianna T. Jones 


1,488.68 


World War II Memorial 


152.31 


Library Funds 




John C. Kimball 


612.28 


Park Funds: 




Applet on Memorial Fountain 1,180.31 


Martha I. Savory Tree 


533.22 


Hannah C. Clarke 


547.20 


Dow Boulder 


260.14 


R. T. Crane Picnic 


40,322.98 


Cemetery: 




Perpetual Care Prin. 


95,792.42 


Flower Fund Principal 


4,150.00 


Perpetual Care Income 


18,494.52 


Flower Fund Income 


1,045.58 


Investment Funds : 




Post War Rehabilitation 


2,449.62 


Stabilization 


;7,%2.72 




203,680.60 


In Custody of Trustees: 




School Funds: 




Burley Education 


9,461.30 


Brown School 


5,288.31 


Manning School Funds 


62,701.84 


Feoffees of Grammar Sch. 


68,078.98 


Library Funds: 




Heard 


10,138.74 


Elizabeth L. Lathrop 


1,854.90 


Library Building 


11,165.92 


Abby Newman 


3,376.34 


George Spill er 


1,812.05 


Treadwell 


15,950.21 




189,828.59 



393,509.19 



393,509.19 



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F-8 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, I964 
General Control 

MODERATOR 



Available: 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


135.00 


Salary 


100.00 






To Revenue 


35.00 




135.00 


135.00 




SELECTMEN 




Available : 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


3,205.00 


Salaries 


2,099.92 






Outside Services 


682.13 






Communications 


50.00 






Supplies 


159,68 
2,991.73 






To Revenue 


213.27 




3,205.00 


3,205.00 




EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 




Available : 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


11,722.00 


Salaries 


12,702.54 


Labor Transfers 


4,130.98 


Outside Services 


344.66 


Mileage Transfer 


350.00 


Communications 


603.76 


Refund 


26.33 


Supplies 


432.21 






Equipment Costs 


664.20 






Capital Outlay- 


410.50 
15,157.87 






To Revenue 


l f 071.44 




16,229.31 


16,229.31 




ACCOUNTING 




Available: 




Expenditures t 




Appropriation 


10,713.00 


Salaries 


22,712.75 


Labor Transfer 


13,522.53 


Outside Services 


132.00 






Communications 


195.75 






Supplies 


424.37 






Capital Outlay 


58.65 
23,523.52 






To Revenue 


712.01 




2^,235.53 


24,235.53 




TREASURER - 


- COLLECTOR 




Available? 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


17,213.00 


Salaries 


17,516.82 


Labor Transfer 


3,518.53 


Outside Services 


678.81 


Reserve Fund 


500.00 


Communications 


1,445.45 






Supplies 


l r 275.34 
20,916.42 






To Overlay Surplus 


315.11 




21,231.53 


21,231.53 




TREASURER - COLLECTOR CASH VARIATION 




Available: 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


50.00 


to Revenue 


50.00 



F-9 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 
Labor Transfer 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Refund 



Available : 
Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Expenditures : 
250.00 Outside Services 
To Revenue 



250.00 




ASSESSORS 


13,858.00 


Expenditures : 

Salaries 


75.00 


Outside Service 


113.90 


Communication 




Supplies 
Equipment Costs 




To Overlay Surplu 


14,046.90 




TOWN CLERK 


6,516.00 


Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Services 




Communications 




Supplies 




To Revenue 



6,516.00 

LEGAL 

Expenditures : 
1,700.00 Salaries 

To Revenue 

1,700.00 

ENGINEERING 



11,926.00 
8.00 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 

Outside Services 
Communications 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
Capital Outlay- 
To Revenue 



11,934.00 

PLANNING BOARD 

Expenditures : 



1,000.00 



1,000.00 



Outside Service 
Supplies 

To Revenue 



155.00 

95.00 

250.00 



12,136.04 
908.98 
232.80 
279.15 

A80.0Q 

14,036.97 

2*22 

14,046.90 



5,751.00 
119.50 
191.70 

HOtW 
6,172.79 

6,516.00 



1,649.65 

SQ.3S 
1,700.00 



9,268.98 

1,099.67 

450.55 

554.29 

430.00 

no. 00 

11,933.49 

a51 

11,034.00 



582.95 
324.04 
906.99 

93.01 

1,000.00 




F-10 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
ELECTION & REGISTRATION 



7,540.00 


Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Services 
Communication 
Supplies 
N. 0. C. 

To Revenue 


5,462.83 

51.00 

50.00 

901.25 

1.059.00 

7,524.08 

15.92 


7,540.00 


7,540.00 


REPORTS 





Expenditures : 
1,200.00 Outside Services 

To Revenue 

1,200.00 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Expenditures : 
200.00 Outside Services 

To Revenue 

200.00 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Expenditures : 
300.00 Outside Services 

To Revenue 

300.00 

TOWN HALL 



7,611.00 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Supplies 
Fuel & Utilities 

To Revenue 



7,611.00 

MEMORIAL BUILDING 



6,679.00 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Services 
Supplies 
Fuel & Utilities 

To Revenue 



6,679.00 

CONSERVATION COMMITTEE 

Expenditures : 
175.00 Outside Services 

To Conservation Fund 

175.00 



966.47 

2??. 5? 

1,200.00 



159.78 

40.22, 

200.00 



90.28 
209.72 
300.00 



4,106.00 

80.14 

674.80 

2. 519. 91 

7,380.85 

2J0.15 

7,611.00 



3,729.56 
517.00 
524.92 

3l.XOO.6l 

5,872.09 
806,91 

6,679.00 



107.52 

67. 43 
175.00 



F-ll 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
CONSERVATION FUND 



Available : 
Balance 
Conservation Committee 



Available : 
Balance 
Appro priat ion 



329.52 

67.48 

397.00 



Expenditures : 
Outside Service 
To 1965 



Available : 
Reserve Fund 



Available: 
Balanc e 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 
Chamber of Commerce 



Available : 
Reserve Fund 



Available : 
Balanc e 



Available : 
Balance 



NATURAL RESOURCE COMMITTEE 



343.04 
3-57.QQ 
500.04 



Expenditures : 

Outside Service 
To Revenue 



Available : 
Appropriation 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Expenditures : 
100.00 Outside Service 

To Overlay Surplus 

100.00 

REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEETING 

Expenditures : 
39.68 To Revenue 

IPSWICH PROMOTION 

Expenditures : 
1,225.00 Outside Service 

700.00 To 1965 

474.3$ 
2,399.36 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

Expenditures : 
250.00 Outside Service 

To Overlay Surplus 

250.00 

BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 

Expenditures : 
566.53 Outside Service 

To 1965 

566.53 

PUBLICATION TOWN CHARTER 

Expenditures : 
700.00 Outside Services 

To Revenue 

700.00 

1$ WAGE INCREASE 

Expenditures : 
6,656.00 Various Departments 



180.00 
217,00. 
397.00 



480.69 
19, 35 

500.04 



78.70 

21.3Q 
100.00 



39.68 



2,323.72 
75.64 

2,399.36 



120.50 

129,5Q 
250.00 



147.23 
419-30 
566.53 



623.75 

76.2,5 

700.00 



6,656.00 



F-12 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 
POLICE 



Available: 
Appropr iat ion 
Refund 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 
Refund 

To Revenue 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Refund 



Available : 
Appropriation 



89,941.00 
9.85 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Communication 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 

To Revenue 



89,950.85 

DOG OFFICER 

Expenditures : 
659.00 Outside Service 

To Revenue 

659.00 

FIRE 



93,815.00 

970.00 

2.00 

94,787.00 

1,240.13 



96,027.13 

FORESTRY 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Communication 
Supplies 
Equipment Cost 
Fuel & Utilities 
Outlay 



28,395.00 
24.90 



Expenditures : 

Salaries 

Outside Services 

Communication 

Supplies 

Equipment Costs 

Outlay- 
To Revenue 



28,419.90 

SHELLFISH & HARBORS 



7,909.00 



7,909.00 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
Outlay 

To Revenue 



85,391.47 

324.42 

826.69 

1,245.33 

2,160.1? 

89,948.04 

Z*%L 

89,950.85 



635.00 

2 4. 
659.00 



88,516.03 
338.28 
1,058.48 
1,215.21 
3,281.34 
1,142.79 

475. QQ 

96,027.13 



18,985.10 

971.80 

1.44 

3,740.95 

3,585.42 

372.8 3 
27,657.54 

762.36 
28,419.90 



6,048.96 
151.45 
245.60 
666.73 
370.00 

7,482.74 
426.26 

7,909.00 



F-13 



Available: 
Balance 
Refund 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Refund 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
MASS. SHELLFISH REIMB. 

Expenditures : 
82.24. Outside Service 
31.55 To 1965 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Labor Transfer 



113.79 




CIVIL DEFENSE 


3,395.00 
4.78 


Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 




G oinraunic a t ions 




Supplies 
Equipment Costs 




To Revenue 



3,399.78 

SAFETY AGENT 

Expenditures : 
400.00 Outside Service 

WEIGHTS & MEASURES 



89.50 

24.29 
113.79 



780.00 
118.75 
167.50 
599.27 

120.00 
1,785.52 
1.614.26 
3,399.78 



400.00 





Expenditures : 




350.00 


Salaries 


250.00 




Supplies 


36.46 




Equipment Costs 


49.92 
336.38 




To Revenue 


13.62 


350.00 


350.00 


HEALTH 






Expenditures : 




18,351.00 


Salaries 


11,964.50 




Outside Service 


1,672.22 




Communication 


247.95 




Supplies 


260.99 




Equipment Costs 


5Z1.36 
L4,687.02 




To Revenue 


3 f 66 3. 98 


18,351.00 


18,351.00 


SEWER 


OPERATING 

Expenditures : 




13,846.00 


Salaries 


6,371.57 


1,281.28 


Outside Service 


730.72 




Communications 


175.64 




Supplies 


2,488.84 




Equipment Costs 


177.76 




Fuel & Utilities 


3,432.57 




Outlay 


U7.00 
13,524.10 




To Revenue 


l f 603.l8 


15,127.28 


15,127.28 



F-14 



Available: 
Appr opr iat ion 
Reserve Fund 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 
Refund 



Available: 
Appropriation 
To Revenue 



Available : 
Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
GARBAGE & RUBBISH COLLECTION 



27,200.00 
2.540.00 


Expenditures : 
N. 0. C. Contract 


29,740.00 


29,740.00 


29,740.00 


TOWN 


DUMP 




5,420.00 
250.00 


Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
N. 0. C. Contract 

To Overlay Surplus 


3,446.78 

203.98 

644.25 

1,274.96 

5,669.97 

.03 


5,670.00 


5,670.00 


MOSQUITO CONTROL 




1,200.00 


Expenditures: 
State Assessment 


1,200.00 


GREENHEAD CONTROL 





Expenditures : 
615.00 To Revenue 



HIGHWAY 



86,461.00 

1,800.00 

137.12 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Communication 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
Outlay 

To Revenue 

To Overlay Surplus 



88,398.12 

HIGHWAY - SNOW REMOVAL 



18,525.00 
4,283.57 



Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
Outlay 



22,808.57 

STREET LIGHTING 

E: penditures : 
10,500.00 Outside Services 

To Revenue 

10,500.00 



615.00 



54,771.24 

3,932.02 

10.00 

25,355.42 

1,969.52 

75. 25 

86,113.45 

484.67 

1.800.00 

88,398.12 



12,317.04 

84.32 

6,470.06 

3,221.87 

715-28 

22,808.57 



10,332.00 

168.00 

10,500.00 



F-15 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
TOWN GARAGE OPERATION 



Available: 




Expenditures: 




Appropriation 


26,920.00 


Salaries 


7,980.26 


Reserve Fund 


3,500.00 


Outside Service 


2,530.96 


Transfer Gasoline 


4,017.47 


Communication 


343.20 


Refund 


38.00 


Supplies 


1,327.44 






Equipment Costs 


20,871.22 






Fuel & Utilities 


1,209.24 






Outlay- 


195.43 
34,457.75 






To Overlay Surplus 


17.72 




34,475.47 


34,475.47 




WELFARE ADMINISTRATION 




Available : 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


6,512.00 


Salaries 


17,365.76 


Balance Federal Grant 


1/1/64 5,043.84 


Outside Service 


1,787.54 


Federal Grant During 


Year 9,669.99 


Communication 


875.88 






Supplies 


358.26 






Equipment Costs 


493.88 






Insurance 


23.62 
20,914.94 






To 1965 


310.89 




21,225.83 


21,225.83 




GENERAL 


RELIEF 




Available: 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


6,550.00 


Cash Payments 


1,211.30 


Refund 


418.44 


Rent 


998.53 






Groceries 


1,378.93 






Fuel 


43.42 






Medical 


632.53 






Other Cities & Towns 


903.69 






Miscellaneous 


8.95 
5,177.35 






To Revenue 


1,791.09 




6,968.44 


6,968.44 




AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 




Available: 




Expenditures: 




Appropriation 


17,000.00 


Cash Allowance 


17,766.49 


Refund 


804.75 


To Revenue 


38.26 




17,804.75 




17,804.75 




OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 




Available : 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


35,000.00 


Cash Allowance 


35,971.31 


Refund 


l,060 t li 


To Revenue 


88.83 




36,060.14 




36,060.14 




DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 




Available : 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


18,000.00 


Cash Allowance 


18,080.30 


Refund 


80.30 







18,080.30 



18,080.30 



F-16 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
MEDICAL AID TO AGED 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Refund 



Available : 
Appropriation 
Refund 
To Revenue 



Available : 
Appropriation 
Refund 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 
Refund 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Refund 



30,000.00 

86. 04 
30,086. 04 


Expenditures : 
Cash Allowance 


VETERANS SERVICE 


21,250.00 

372.75 

4,441.66 


Expenditures : 
Cash Allowance 
Groceries 
Fuel 
Medical 
Miscellaneous 


26,064.41 




RECREATION 


15,340.00 
32.57 


Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Communication 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
N. 0. C. 




To Revenue 


15,372.57 




PARKS 


9,441.00 
205.00 
190.49 


Expenditures : 
Salaries 
Outside Service 
Supplies 
Equipment Costs 
Fuel & Utilities 
Outlay- 




To Overlay Surplu 


9,836.49 




TOWN CLOCK & BELL 


100.00 
350,00 
450.00 


Expenditures : 
Outside Service 


JULY 4TH 


500.00 


Expenditures : 
Outside Service 
To Revnue 



500.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Expenditures : 
800.00 Outside Service 

7.36 To Revenue 
807.36 



30,086.04 
30,086.04 



16,836.75 

971.24 

878.25 

7,318.17 

frO.QQ. 

26,064.41 



10,807.00 

736.39 

444.16 

1,527.77 

279.99 

1^07.65 

15,302.86 

69.71 
15,372.57 



6,835.79 
189.32 
546.43 
557.99 
477.32 
1,13,9.07 
9,725.92 

110-57 
9,836.49 



450.00 
450.00 



499.70 

»3fl 

500.00 



774.95 
807.36 



F-17 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
CEMETERIES 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 



Available : 
Reserve Fund 



63,784.50 

INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION 

Expenditures : 
3,500.00 Anticipation Taxes 

A28.00 To Overlay Surplus 
3,928.00 

BOND ISSUE EXPENSE 

Expenditures : 



Available: 




Expenditures : 




Appr opriat ion 


28,559.00 


Salaries 


26,949.74 


Refund 


124.25 


Outside Service 


413.30 


Perpetual Care Reimb. 


3,400.00 


Communication 


360.94 


Flower Fund Reimb. 


200.00 


Supplies 


1,712.45 






Equipment Costs 


1,571.61 






Fuel & Utility 


325.09 






Outlay- 


»,96 
31,670.09 






To Revenue 


613.16 




32,283.25 


32,283.25 




MATURING DEBT 




Available: 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


201,000.00 


Sewerage Loan 


9,000.00 


To Revenue 


5,500.00 


School 1964 


75,000.00 






School Loan 


5,000.00 






School Loan 1955 


20,000.00 






School 


10,000.00 






School 


50,000.00 






Sewerage 


8,000.00 






Sewer 


5,500.00 






Municipal Garage 


2,000.00 






Sewer Loan 


2,000.00 






Sewer 


20 r 000.00 




206,500.00 




206,500.00 




INTEREST ON MATURING DEBT 




Available : 




Expenditures : 




Appropriation 


61,416.00 


Sewerage Loan 1962 


1,347.50 


Reserve Fund 


1,137.00 


School Loan 1962 


18,425.00 


To Revenue 


1,231.50 


School Loan 1962 


1,392.00 






School Loan 1956 


5,400.00 






Sewerage 1946 


17,760.00 






School Loan 1955 


2,700.00 






School Loan 1948 


11,850.00 






Sewer Loan 


2,040.00 






Sewer Loan 


1,232.00 






Sewerage 


306.00 






Sewerage 1964 


300.00 






Sewer 1964 


837.00 






Municipal Garage 


195.00 



190.44 
190.44 



Outside Service 
To Overlay Surplus 



63,784.50 



3,927.11 

*82 

3,928.00 



182.46 

7.96 

190.44 



F-18 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 

INSURANCE 

Available : Expenditures : 

Appropriation 21,350,00 Building Fire & Comp. 98 35 

Transfer 6,706.03 Building Public Liab. 1,977^5 

m & ?? 4,918.29 

Surety Bonds 558.53 

Workmens Comp. 12,452.68 

Floater 775.22 

Boiler 798.7A 

21,579.26 

To Revenue 6.Z76-77 

28,056.03 2^056tQ3 

UNPAID BILLS 

Available : Expenditures : 

Appropriation 868.38 Pete»s Auto Clinic 9.20 

J. P. McCormack 13.00 

Smith's Fire Equipment 4. 50 

DeAmarios Jenney 17.45 

Ipswich Family Laundry 7.13 

Haverhill Gas 1.54 

Carmen Milling 8.50 

M. Linsky 27.50 

Atlantic & Pacific Co. 8.28 

Conleys Drug Store 13.14 

Ipswich Electric Shop 14.49 

Hills Men's Shop 38.80 

Chester J. Patch, Jr. 500.00 

R E A Express 3.25 

National Recreation Assn. 8.10 

Martin Mailet 75.00 

Upland Farms 20.00 

J. A. Singer 93.50 

863.38 

To Revenue 5.00 

868.38 868.38 

RESERVE FUND 

Available : Expenditures : 

Appropriation 11,982.00 Interest Maturing Debt 1,137.00 

Interest Tax Anticipation 428.00 

Historic Distric Comm. 100.00 

Bond Issue Expense 190.44 

Highway 1,800.00 

Fire 970.00 

Town Dump 250.00 
Garbage & Rubbish Collection 2,540.00 

Building Inspection 250.00 

Town Garage 3,500.00 

Treasurer - Collector 500.00 

Parks 205.00 

Assessors 75,00 

11,945.44 

To Overlay Surplus 36.56 

11,982.00 11,982.00 



F-19 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
TAX MAPS 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balanc e 
Refund 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Receipt 



CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION 1963 

Expenditures : 
26,195.03 Labor, Supplies & Equip, 

9AA.00 
27,139.03 

CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION 1964 

Expenditures : 
9,250.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip, 

To 1965 

9,250.00 

CHAPTER 822 

Expenditures : 
15,491.84 Chapter 90 1964 

Central St. Widening 

15,491.84 



Expenditures : 
618.27 Outside Services 
A00.00 To 1965 
1,018.27 


707.04 
1,018.27 


LAND DAMAGE 




Expenditures : 
1.00 To 1965 


1.00 


LAND PURCHASE 




Expenditures : 
84.00 Tilton 
9,920.00 Hills 

To 1965 


8,500.00 
650.00 

9,150.00 
85A-00 


10,004.00 


10,004.00 


DEED ACCEPTANCES 




Expenditures : 
5.00 To 1965 


5.00 


IRLEY BROOK EASEMENTS 




Expenditures : 
10.00 To 1965 


10.00 


PARKING LOT LEASES 




Expenditures : 
102.75 To 1965 


102.75 


>E OR LEASE LAND PARKING LOT 




Expenditures : 
8,500.00 To 1965 


8,500.00 



27,139.03 

27,139.03 



7,751.65 

1^98.?5 

9,250.00 



9,250.00 

6,341.34 
15,491.84 



F-20 



Available: 
Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 

CHAPTER 90 MAINTENANCE 1964 

Expenditures : 
2,400.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

CORNER IMPROVEMENT 



2,^00.00 



Available : 
Balance 



Expenditures : 
300.00 To 1965 

PLAINS ROAD 



300.00 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available: 
Chapter 822 
Refund 



Available: 
Balance 



Expenditures : 
620.83 Labor, Supplies, Equip. 
l f 000.00 To 1965 
1,620.83 

STREETS WITH SEWER TRENCHES 

Expenditures : 
83.62 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 
6,5QQ,QO. To 1965 
6,583.62 

CHARLOTTE & RANDALL RD. CONST. 



1,000.00 

LINEBROOK ROAD CONSTRUCTION 

Expenditures : 
3,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

To Revenue 

3,000.00 

SOUTH MAIN TO WINTHROP SCHOOL PAVING 

Expenditures : 
4,390.60 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

CENTRAL STREET WIDENING 

Expenditures : 
6,241.84 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

18.68 
6,260.52 

PLOVER HILL PAVING 

Expenditures : 
163.22 To Revenue 



753.30 

867,5? 

1,620.83 



5,469.21 
6,583.62 



Expenditures : 
1,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 
To 1965 


913.23 
86.77 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


MILE LANE CONSTRUCTION 




Expenditures : 
1,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 
To 1965 


960.00 
49. W 



1,000.00 



2,999.70 

ao 

3,000.00 



4,390.60 



6,260.52 
6,260.52 



163.22 



F-21 



Available: 
Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
MUNICIPAL PARKING LOTS 

Expenditures : 
2,500.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

To 1965 

2,500.00 

TOWN WHARF 



1,089.58 

IMPM 
2,500.00 



Available: 
Balance 



Expenditures : 
18,000.00 To 1965 

HIGH STREET DRAINAGE 



18,000.00 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available : 
Balanc e 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Expenditures : 
136.78 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 
l r 800.00 To 1965 
1,936.78 

FARLEY BROOK REPIPING 

Expenditures : 
15,000.00 To 1965 
11,000.00 
26,000.00 

LINEBROOK ROAD DRAINAGE 

Expenditures : 
964.86 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 
l f 800-00 To Revenue 
2,764.86 

CENTRAL ST. DRAIN 

Expenditures : 
375.21 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

To 1965 

375.21 

SEWER PLANT DRAIN 

Expenditures : 
79.74 To Revenue 

LORD SQUARE DRAINAGE 

Expenditures : 
600.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

To Revenue 

600.00 

MITCHELL ROAD DRAINAGE 

Expenditures : 
600.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 



1,133.01 

803.77 

1,936.78 



26,000.00 
26,000.00 



2,751.61 
2,764.86 



286.48 

88.21 

375.21 



79.74 



594.79 
600.00 



600.00 




F-22 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available s 
Balance 
Refund 



Available: 
Appropriation 
Refund 



Available : 
Balance 
Serial Loan 
Refund 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 

NEW SIDEWALKS 

Expenditures : 

122.20 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 532.39 

If OOP- 00 To 1965 589.81 

1,122.20 1,122.20 

SIDEWALK REPLACEMENT 

Expenditures : 
2,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 2,000.00 

HIGH STREET SIDEWALK - SCHOOL 

Expenditures : 

962.75 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 1,672.07 

5 r 800.00 To 1965 5 f 090.68 

6,762.75 6,762.75 

GUARD RAILS 

Expenditures : 

1,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 392.03 

To 1965 607.07 

1,000.00 1,000.00 

TRUNK LINE SEWER WALL 

Expenditures : 

1,097.50 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 131.00 

6 r 000-00 To 1965 6 r 966.50 

7,097.50 7,097.50 

JEFFREYS NECK ROAD SEWER 

Expenditures : 
182.04 To 1965 182.04 

HIGH ST. & LORDS SQUARE SEWER 

Expenditures : 

11.502.49 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 6, 412.59 
390.01 To 1965 5,479.91 

11.892.50 11,892.50 

CENTRAL ST. LORDS SQUARE SEWER 

Expenditures : 

13,500.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 12,638.26 

39.00 To 1965 . 900.7,4 

13,539,00 13,539.00 

EAST, HOVEY & LIBERTY ST. SEWER 

Expenditures : 
4,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 52,412.75 
54,000.00 To 1965 5,597.60 

10.35 -3 — : 

58,010.35 58,010.35 



F-23 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Balanc e 
Serial Loan 
APW Mass 93 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 

SOUTH SIDE SEWER 

Expenditures : 
10,000.00 Supplies 

To 1965 

10,000.00 

SEWER TREATMENT PLANT 

Expenditures : 
39,353.99 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 
20,500.00 To 1965 
34,200.00 
94,053.99 

PARKING LOT & LIGHTHOUSE IMP. 



36 .40 

9.963.6Q 
10,000.00 



93,637.40 
416.59 

94,053.99 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Appropriation 
Refund 



418.87 
1,000.00. 
1,418.87 


Expenditures : 
Labor, Supplies 
To 1965 


& Equip. 


1,253.56 

165.31 
1,418.87 


CEMETERY PAVING 






526.63 


Expenditures : 
To 1965 




526.63 


FIRE ALARM 






1,000.00 


Expenditures : 

Labor, Supplies 
To 1965 


& Equip. 


628.70 
371-30 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


TOWN HALL 


IMPROVEMENT 






3,300.00 

10.01 

3,310.01 


Expenditures : 

Labor, Supplies 
To Revenue 


& Equip. 


3,272.62 

37.39 
3,310.01 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 



SIGNS 

Expenditures : 
500.00 Supplies 

RADIO EQUIPMENT 

Expenditures : 
361.24 Civil Defense 
1,525.00 Fire 

Police 



1,886.24 



To Revenue 



500.00 



713.81 
53.00 

799.QQ 
1,565. a 

330.4? 
1,886.24 



F-24 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 
VEHICULAR EQUIPMENT 



Available: 
Balanc e 
Appropriation 
Sewer Receipts 



Reserved 



Available: 
Balanc e 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balanc e 



Available : 
Appropriation 



2,382.27 

25,200.00 

2,200.00 



Expenditures : 
Stone Spreader 
4 Door Sedan 
Jeep 

Station Wagons 
2\ Ton Truck 
Pick Up Truck 
Plows 

To Revenue 



1,639.20 
1,856.00 
2,700.00 
4,596.93 
6,394.50 
1,877.84 
1.243,92, 
20,308.39 



29,782.27 




29,782.27 


OTHER ACQUISITIONS 




1,458.93 
1,900.00 


Expenditures : 
Police Uniforms 
Election Precincts. 


70.80 
383.60 




Tent 
To Revenue 


450.00 

904.40 

2 f 454.53 


3,358.93 


3,358.93 


SALE OF REFUSE BODIES 




2,220.00 


Expenditures : 
Box Spreader 


2,220.00 


PURCHASE 


OF BULLDOZER 




17,500.00 


Expenditures : 
Bulldozer 
To Revenue 


15,790.85 
1.709.15 



17,500.00 



17,500.00 



EDUCATION 



Available : 



Expenditures : 



94,278.43 



Appropriation 

Feoffees of Grammar School 

P. L. 864 

Refunds 

Night School 


950,126.00 

5,000.00 

1,845.25 

655.64 

510.00 


General Control 
Expense of Instruction 
School Plant Operation 
Maint. & Repairs 
Auxiliary Agencies 
Outlay- 
To Revenue 

K)L CAFETERIA 

Expenditures : 
Labor & Supplies 


30,977.77 
689,033.04 

93,272.20 

14,360.28 
118,215.43 

12,232.79 

958,091.51 

1AM 


available : 
Balanc e 
Receipts 
To 1965 


958,136.89 
IPSWICH SCHC 

280.95 

93,819.47 

178.01 


958,136.89 
94,278.43 



94,278.43 



F-25 



Available: 
Balanc e 
Receipts 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



Available : 
Balance 
Receipts 



Available : 
Receipts 



Available! 
Balance 



Available: 
Receipts 
To 1965 



Available: 

Balance 

Refund 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 

ATHLETIC RECEIPTS 

Expenditures : 
1,775.91 Labor & Supplies 
4.395.60 To 1965 
6,071.51 

ATHLETIC APPROPRIATION 

Expenditures: 
11,500.00 Labor & Supplies 

To Revenue 

11,500.00 

LIBRARY 

Expenditures : 
32,136.00 Outside Services 

To Revenue 

32,136.00 

FEDERAL SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENT PL 874 

Expenditures : 
66.09 Miscellaneous 
l^AQZ^Q To 1965 
1,473.09 

FEDERAL SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENT PL 864 

Expenditures : 
3,691.27 Miscellaneous 
Transfer 

To 1965 



3,691.27 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Expenditures : 
116.17 To Revenue 

ADULT EDUCATION CLASS 

Expenditures : 
710.00 Outside Service 

?9,0Q 
749.00 

SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 1092 

Expenditures : 
53,806.02 Labor, Supplies & Equip, 

lPO.tt To 1965 
53,906.38 



3,359.74 
3.73J..77 
6,071.51 



11,496.68 

2*22 

11,500.00 



32,135.99 

iSL 

32,136.00 



21.60 
1,473.09 



340.58 
l f 845.25 
2,185.83 
1,505.44 
3,691.27 



116.17 



749.00 



749.00 



49,952.40 
53,906.38 



F-26 



Available: 
Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT) 

HIGH SCHOOL SHE IMP. 

Expenditures : 
10,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip, 

To 1965 

10,000.00 

BAND FUND 



1,618.84 
10,000.00 



Available : 
Balance 



Available : 
Refund 



Available: 
Serial Loan 



Expenditures : 
221.57 To 1965 

TEACHERS RETIRS'ENT 

Expenditures : 
18.13 To Revenue 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CONST. 1285 

Expenditures : 
498,000.00 Labor, Supplies & Equip. 

To 1965 

498,000.00 



221.57 



18.13 



220,198.55 
377,801.45 
498,000.00 



Available : 
Appropriation 



Available: 
Appropriation 



PENSIONS 

Expenditures : 
2,230.00 Outside Services 
________ To Revenue 

2,230.00 

CONTRIBUTORY PENSIONS 

Expenditures : 
48,412.00 Outside Services 



1,672.32 

557.68 

2,230.00 



48,412.00 



F-27 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1964 



Departmental Expenditures 2,540,960.28 


Electric Light: 








Operation 


533,002.37 


Federal Grants: 




Construction 


39,891.02 


Welfare Administration 


14,402.94 


Depreciation 


65,120.8? 


Old Age Assistance 


46,574.99 




638,014.22 


Disability Assistance 


10,277.05 






Aid Dependent Children 


10,765.88 


Water Department: 




Medical Aid to Aged 


15.793.44 


Operation 


126,713.77 




97,814.30 


Construction 


11,396.92 






Water Improvement 


405.206.05 


State & County Requirements: 






543,316.74 


Paris & Reservations 1964 


5,593.78 






County Tax 1964 


43,637.53 


Debt: 




County Sanatorium Tax 1964 


6,111.13 


Maturing Debt 


206,500.00 


State Audit 


4,428.06 


Interest on Maturing Debt 


63,784.50 


MVX Tax Bills 


778.35. 


Interest Antic, of Revenue 


3,927.11 




60,548.85 


Bond Issue Expense 


182.46 
274,394.07 


Agency: 








Dog Licenses Collected for 




Loans in Anticipation Revenue400,000.00 


County 


1,493.75 






Retirement Deductions 


32,071.62 


Treasury Bills 


951,610.08 


Federal Withholding Tax 


163,438.25 


Certificates of Deposit 

1 


300 r 000.00 


Deductions 


,251,610.08 


State Withholding Tax 








Deductions 


20,905.80 


Refunds : 




Blue Cross Deductions 


34.7*4.11 


Real Estate Tax 


8,725.91 




242,693.53 


Poll Tax 


2.00 






Personal Property Tax 


75.95 


Trust Funds: 




Motor Vehicle Excise 


7,483.20 


Eunice Caldwell Cowles 


928.56 


Sewer to Taxes 


62.64 


R. T. Crane Picnic Fund 


2,286.56 


Sewer Committed Interest 


33.84 


Hannah C. Clarke 


35.06 


Water Liens 


252.95 


Martha I. Savory 


18.52 


Apportioned Sewer Paid in 




Stabilization Fund 


709.28 


Advance 


.47 


Mark Newman Fund 


246.23 


Electric A/R 


793.00 


Mrs. William G. Brown 


103.51 


Water A/R 


541.67 


Applet on Memorial 


69.90 


Sewer A/R 


10.54 


Dow Boulder Memorial 


10.71 


Federal Withholding 


36.30 


John C. Kimball 


25.22 


State Withholding 


4.53 


Marianna T. Jones 


61.31 


Retirement 


41.36 


Rehabilitation 


100.88 


Interest 


.03 


World War II Memorial 


166.06 


Meter Deposit 


1,136.17 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 






19,200.56 


Bequests 


2,680.00 






Cemetery Perpetual Care 








Income 


3,915.09 






Cemetery Flower Fund 




Total Payments 6,080,221.23 


Income 


222.21 
11,579.10 







Mass. Shellfish Reimb. 



89.50 



F-28 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1964 



Taxes : 
Current Year : 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Previous Years 
Poll 

Personal 
Real Estate 



Farm Animal Excise 

Privileges : 
Motor Vehicle 1962 
Motor Vehicle 1963 
Motor Vehicle 1964 



Special Assessment: 
Unapportioned Sewer 1963 
Unapportioned Sewer 1964 
Sewer Paid in Advance 
Sewer to Taxes 1962 
Sewer to Taxes 1963 
Sewer to Taxes 1964 
Committed Interest 1962 
Committed Interest 1963 
Committed Interest 1964 



Licenses & Permits: 
Liquor 

Hawkers & Peddlars 
Pistol 
Amusement 
Auto Dealer 

Cqbin, yotel & Occupancy- 
Shellfish 
Common Victualler 
Garbage 
Junk 

Methyl Alcohol 
Milk, Cream & Oleo 
Rendering 
Slaughtering 
Theater 
Nursery 

Building Removal 
Building Permit 
Auctioneer 
Agents & Vendors 
Disposal License 
Plumbing 
Sewerage 

Sewer Connection Fees 
Gas Installer 
Sewerage Installer 
Gas Pump License 
Gas Inspection 



75,999.00 
1. 421. 261. 38 
1,497,260.38 



534.00 

8,483.25 

146.071.28 

155,088.53 

147.39 



122.67 
55,549.10 

174,124,34 
229,796.61 



12,542.18 

468.00 

3,751.16 

62.88 

391.28 

4,317.71 

41.16 

406.51 

3 r 157.59 

25,138.47 



10,449.70 

-0- 

114.00 

323.00 

40.00 

124.50 

3,236.00 

86.00 

2.00 

50.00 

17.00 

97.00 

8.00 

100.00 

60.00 

-0- 

14.00 

1,396.00 

6.00 

50.00 

666.00 

1,557.00 

10.00 

640.00 

-0- 

130.00 

-0- 

697.00 
19,873.20 

F-29 



Fines & Forfeits 

Grants & Gifts: 
Federal : 
Welfare Administration 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Old Age Assistance 
Disability Assistance 
Medical Aid to Aged 
P. L. 85 - 874 
P. L. 85 - 864 
A.P.W. Mass. 93 
A.P.W. Mass 71G 



State: 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Old Age Assistance 
Disability Assistance 
Medical Aid to Aged 
Veterans Service 
General Relief 
Income Tax 

Income Tax Chapter 70 
Corporation Tax 
Meals Tax 
Lieu of Taxes 
Aid to Highways Chap. 90 
Aid to Libraries 
School Aid Chapter 69 + 71 
School Aid Const. Chap. 645 
School Transportation 
Marine 

Vocational Education 
Youth Service Board 
Health Reimb. 
Aid to Highway, Chap. 822 



County: 
Dog License Refund 
Aid to Highways 



556.00 



9,669.99 
10,950.50 
44,636.34 

7,507.00 
21,419.28 

1,407.00 

3,691.27 
34,200.00 

278,231.38 



8,429.88 

24,619.18 

14,301.41 

16,131.08 

9,927.87 

386.53 

35,505.88 

80,852.53 

68,690.95 

5,776.60 

9,441.10 

30,133.04 

2,136.00 

5,366.00 

62,650.12 

-0- 

-0- 

1,733.97 

-0- 

943.00 

392,516.98 



2,045.99 
15 f 066.52 
17,112.51 



Other : 
Feoffees Grammar School 5,000.00 

Disability Assistance Recovery 214.80 
Sale of Fill 8.00 

Campanelli 23,000.00 

Chamber of Commerce 474.36 

28,697.16 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS (CONT.) 



Departmental : 
Town Property: 
Cranes Beach 
Ipswich Housing 
Town Farm Lease 
Anti-Trust 

Rent of Court Room 
Sale of Town Property- 
Pavilion Lease 

Town Clerk: 
Miscellaneous Fees 
Dog Licenses for County 
Sale of Booklets 
Photostats 



Treasurer : 
Interest & Costs 
Tax Title & Interest 
Tax Certificates 
Sewer Bett Release 
Deposit on Hearings 
Treasury Bills 
Certificates of Deposit 
Treasury Bills Interest 



7,190.65 

2,616.83 

2,499.96 

2,571.44 

500. CC 

550.00 

100.00 

16,028.83 

810.00 
1,090.00 

156.00 

6.00 

2,062.00 



8,885.74 

3,214.27 

266.00 

10.00 

90.00 

902,068.19 

200,000.00 

5,714.35 

1,120,248.55 



Cemeteries: 
Perpetual Care 
Annual Care 
Sale of Lots 
Opening 
Liners 
Foundation 
Raising 
Tent 
Removal 
Plants 



3,100.00 

861.50 

675.00 

4,742.00 

600.00 

987.25 

93.00 

210.00 

55.00 

Ltgp 

11,330.95 



Cemetery Reimb. for Expenses 
Perpetual Care Income 3,400.00 

Flower Fund Income 200.00 

3,600.00 



Protection of Persons & Property: 
Police: 
Ambulance 
Bicycle Registration 



730.00 

49.00 

779.00 



Electric Light Department: 
Sales 

Meter Deposit & Income 
Anti-Trust 



Water Department: 
Sales 
Liens 



Sewer Department 
Sales 



682,757.93 
1,737.06 

469,04 
684,964.03 



133,436.39 

8 r 128.17 

141,564.56 



3,654.59 
Loans in Anticipation Revenue400,000.00 



Sealer of Weights & Measures: 94.50 Serial Loans: 



Health & Sanitation: 
Slaughter Inspection 
Dog Clinic 



Recreation: 
Dancing Classes 
Beach Stickers 
Use of Lighthouse 
Special Activity 



Education: 
Tuition 

Driver Education 
Adult Education 
Special Classes 
School Cafeteria 
Athletic Receipts 
Rental 



Highways 



3,916.11 

70.00 

3,986.11 



203.96 

1,276.80 

340.00 

326.00 

2,146.76 



3,245.00 
1,068.00 
1,060.00 
3.00 
93,819.47 
4,295.60 

15. 00 
103,506.07 

655.26 



School 

Water 

Sewer 

Premiums on Loans 

Interest on Loans 



Insurance Receipts 

Agency: 

Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
Retirement Systen 

Deductions 
Blue Cross Deductions 



Tailings 

Trust Funds: 
Cemetery Trust 
Eunice Caldwell Cowles 
Hannah C. Clarke 
Martha I. Savory 
Mark Newman 
Marianna T. Jones 
Rehabilitation 
Mrs. William G. Brown 
R. T. Crane Picnic 



498,OOC.OO 

241,500.00 

74,500.00 

2,395.80 

238.4Z 

816,634.24 

2,047.54 



161,824.22 
18,547.57 

34,938.87 

24,799.49 

240,110.15 

3,014.52 



3,806.14 
425.43 

30.81 

18.52 
246.23 

61.31 
100.88 

64.06 
175.69 



F-30 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS (CONT.) 



Trust Funds (Cont.) 

Appleton Memorial 5.00 

John C. Kimball 25.22 

World War II 6.43 

Cemetery Flower Fund 222.21 

Dow Boulder 10.71 

Electric Depreciation Fund 1,753.29 

Stabilization Fund 709.28 
E. C. Cowles Scholarship Reimb. 800.00 
R. T. Crane Picnic Expense 

Reimb. 2,258.69 

Appleton Memorial Reimb. Exp. 64.98 

Wm. G. Brown Reimb. Exp. 39,46 





10,824.33 


Refunds : 




Cemetery 


124.25 


O.A.A. 


1,060.14 


Town Hall Ma int. 


10.01 


Memorial Day 


7.36 


Highway 


137.12 


Recreation 
• V. Insurance 


32.57 


486.95 


Workmens Compensation 


6,219.08 


Parks 


190.49 


Education 


790.96 


Surplus Revenue 


193.31 


Water Imp. 


13.90 


Federal Withholding 


2.80 


Teachers Retirement 


18.13 


General Relief 


418.44 


Electric 


1,383.28 


State Withholding 


.48 


Vets Services 


372.75 


Engineering 


8.00 


Central St. Widening 


18.68 


High School Sewer 


390.01 


Forestry 


24.90 


Athletics 


21.40 


Civil Defense 


4.78 


Sewer Construction 


49.35 


School Construction 1092 


100.36 


A.D.C. 


804.75 


Executive Secretary 


26.33 


Police 


9.85 


Town Garage 


38.00 


D.A. 


80.30 


Water 


1.00 


Fire 


2.00 


M.A.A. 


86.04 


Chapter 90 1963 


944.00 




14,071.77 


Miscellaneous 


264.03 


Total Receipts 


6.226.006.45 



F-31 



BUELEY EDUCATION FUND 
INVESTED FUNDS AS OF JANUARY 1, 1965: 

Deposited in the Salem Savings Bank $1,620.28 

n « n Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 1,434.94 

" " n Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 2,863.24 

■ " n Ipswich Savings Bank 2,542.84 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank - Paid Up Certificates l f 000.00 



$9,461.30 



INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR THE YEAR 1964 AS FOLLOWS: 



Interest - Salem Savings Bank $ 67.65 

n Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 59.38 

" Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 117.92 

M Ipswich Savings Bank 103.73 

Dividend - Ipswich Co-operative ^ank 42.52 

$ 391.20 

EXPENDITURES: 

Safe Deposit Box Rent for Year 1965-1966 5.50 

$ 385.70 
Wilmot E. Hall, Treasurer 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND 

Balance January 31, 1964 2,649.39 

Interest Thru October 30, 1964 114.38 

Salem Five Cent Savings 2,763.77 

Balance January 31, 1964 2,420.57 

Interest Thru October 30, 1964 103.97 

Ipswich Savings Bank 2 . 524 . 54 

Total Value of Fund 5,288.31 

J. Perry Smith, Treasurer 



F-32 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Trust Funds - 1964 









Lower of 






Book 


Market 


Cost or 


1964 


Fund 


Value 


Value 


Market 


Income 


Trea dwell 


$16,241.54 


$38,074*62 


$15,375.38 


$1,082.60 


Heard 


10,143.12 


16,703.52 


10,108.01 


589.97 


Lathrop 


1,354.90 


1,854.90 


1,854.90 


78.86 


Spiller 


1,812.05 


1,812.05 


1,812.05 


78.60 


Newman 


3,667.12 


3,652.12 


3,652.12 


147.82 


Building 


11 P A68.85 


11^53.85 


11,451.35 


A83.19 


Total 1964 


$45,187.58 


$73,551.06 


$44,253.81 


$2,461.04 


Total 1963 


44,746.06 


68,774.31 


43,574.92 


2,363.03 


Increase (Decrease) 


$ 441.52 


$ 4,776.75 


$ 678.89 


$ 98.01 



D. W. Poor, Jr., Treasurer 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 



Financial Statement 

Balance January 1, 1964 
Income 1964 

Expenditures 
Balance, December 31, 1964 

Little Neck, Valued at 

Store Building 

Cash on Hand or in First National Bank, Ipswich 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 

Interest earned on same 1964 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, Farm Acct. 
Interest earned on same 1964 



$ 8,789.18 
56,263,26 
65,052.44 

$13,396.47 



3,527.22 
151.50 

7,931.13 
240.66 



$16,500.00 

10,000.00 

13,396.47 
3,678.72 



8,271.79 



78 shares First National Bank, Boston 
100 n National Shawmut Bank, Boston 
Ipswich Cooperative Bank, paid-up 
share certificate 



Cost 
2,748.18 
2,748.63 

2.000.00 
7,496.81 



Present 
Value 
7,332.00 
6,900.00 

2.000.00 
16,232.00 



16.232.00 
$68,078.98 



******************** 



$5,000.00 was paid to the Town for Support of the schools. 
The following taxes were paid to the Town: 



Land 
Store 
Barn 
Cottages 



Assessed Value 
n « 



17,500.00 

4,000.00 

300.00 

321,500.00 



$ 1,980.00 

480.00 

36.00 

38.638.75 

$41,134.75 



F-33 



TRUSTEES OF THE MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 

William H. Burnham, Jr. Charles E. Goodhue, Jr. Donald F. Whiston 
David C Williams M. Charles Arthur 



Report for the year ending December 31, 1964- 
THE MANNING SCHOOL FUND 

January 1, 1964 

Balance in A/C #14293 Ipswich Savings Bank 
w M " # 7884 ■ " " 



Income from interest and dividends 

Proceeds Sale 9 shares Ches. & Ohio R. R. Stock 



135,697.10 

17,705.19 
53,402.29 

2,823.27 

1,099,42 

57,324.98 



Less Disbursements: 



Rent of Safe Deposit Box 5.50 

Purchase of Books for Manning Memorial 

Library 2 f l69.& 



2, 175, 34 
$55,149.64 



Assets in Fund 

Balance in A/c #14293 Ipswich Savings Bank 
nun 78^4 nun 

n it tt ^995 Ipswich Cooperative Bank 



Securities at book value: 

92 shares First National Bank of Boston 

16 n Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. Common Stock 

20 " Ipswich Cooperative Bank 

Total Assets in Funds 



$36,236.15 

17,814.07 

1,099.42 



2,998.20 

554.00 

L f 000. 00 



55,149.64 



7,552.30 
$62,701.84 



Report submitted by M. Chas. Arthur, Treasurer 



F-34 



COMPARATIVE TAX STRUCTURE STATEMENT 

1963 19 61* 

A. Total appropriation to be 

raised by taxation* 2,037,906.89 2,1*08,752.67 

Total appropriation to be 

taken from available funds. 11*7,320.81* 64,210.% 

2,105,227.73 2,i*72,963.£l 

B. State Requirement: 

Parks & Reservations 1*, 563.68 6,095.73 

Audit 2, 826 .87 1*, 1*28 . 06 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 778.35 

Underestimated Previous Years: 

Parks & Reservations — 562.78 

Audit — 

Mosquito Control -——.——. — — ... 

Shellfish Purification I4.78.8I4. — 

7,069.39 11,861*.92 

C. County Requirement: 

Tax 1*1,91*2.65 1*2,716.1*8 

T. B. Hospital 11*,237.2I* 6,111.13 

Underestimated T. B. Hospital-— — — — -~ 

County Tax — 

56,179.8$ 1*8,827.61 

D. Overlay 35,161*. 75 93,251.52 

E. Gross amount to be raised 2,287,91*1.76 2, 629, 591*. 16 

?. Estimated receipts & available 
funds ; 

State Income 183,303.31 20l*,119.50 

Local Revenue 393,903.67 1*02,200.00 

Water Revenue 165,385,00 197, 781*. 00 
Overestimates of Previous 
Years: 

County Tax 2, 101*. 19 903.22 

State Parks 1*39.06 

T.B. Hospital 

Essex County Project 

Surplus Revenue 11*3,820.81* 

Electric Light 10,000.00 15,000.00 

Overlay Reserve Fund 3,500.00 1,982.00 

Machinery Fund -.— — — — — 

Sewer Receipts Reserve — — — 1*6,087.00 

Stabilization Fund 

Chap. 822 - 15,1*91.81* 

Sale of Cemetery 650.00 

902,1*56.0? 881*, 217.56 

G. Net amount to be raised by 
taxation: 
Poll Tax 5,l;io.oo — 

Personal Property 63,933.21* 79,1*39.1*0 

Real Estate 1,316,11*2.1*5 1,665,937.20 

1,3^5,1*85.69 1,?J*5, 376.60 

Gross amount raised 2,287,91*1.76 2, 629, 591*. 16 



F-35 



1963 196^ 

H. Assessed Valuation: 

Real Estate 13,430,025.00 13,882,810.00 

Personal Property 652,380.00 661,995.00 

14,682,405.06 14, 5Ww 805.06 

No. of Polls 2,705 

I. Tax Rate 98.00 120.00 

STATEMENT OF 1964 ASSESSMENT 

1964 Tax Rate 120.00 per 1000 

Persons Assessed: 

Personal Estate — — — -- — - — - — — - 679 

Real Estate 3552 

Personal and Real Estate 399 

Total £o3ff 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate: 

Stock in Trade 101,235.00 

Machinery 96,475.00 

Live Stock 21,110.00 

All other Tangible Personal Property 443# 175.00 

661,995. 00 

Farm Animal Excise 31,850.00 

Total 693»»45.00 

Value of Assessed Real Estate: 

Land exclusive of buildings — -- 2,402,140.00 

Buildings exclusive of land 11,480,670.00 

Total 13,882,810.00 

Total Value of Assessed Personal and 

Real Estate — — - — — — 14,544*805.00 

Total Taxes Assessed for State, County and 

Town Purposes, including Overlay ——-.-—»— 1,836,628.12 

Farm Animal Excise — 159.27 

Total 1,036,707.39 

Number of Livestock Assessed: 

Horses (1 year old, or over) — 68 

Cows (Milch) 82 

Neat Cattle — «? 56 

Steers — 74 

Swine 30 

Sheep — — — 24 

Fowl - 2850 

No. Acres Land Assessed 17545 

No. of Dwelling Houses Assessed 2829 



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F-^2 



WATER DIVISION 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
DECEMBER 31, 1964 



BXPWSeft,: 




Ooeratiner : 




Ma int. Water Supply Structure 47.00 


Electricity Purchased 


9,090.99 


Maint. of Power Bldgs. 


73.19 


Ma int. Pumping Equipment 


588.86 


Purification Supplies & Exp. 


476.66 


Insp. Customer Installations 


2,362.74 


General Labor 


18,871.51 


Maint. Trans. & Dist. Mains 


7,754.59 


Maint. Reservoirs & 




Standpipe 


83.19 


Maint. of Services 


10,424.59 


Maint. of Meters 


1,109.83 


Maint. of Hydrants 


6A3.91 



Administrative: 
General Office Salaries 
General Office Supplies & 

Expense 
Insurance 
Transportation 
Maint. of General Structures 
Depreciation 
Misc. General Expense 
Pensions 
Interest on Bonds 



Total Expenses 
Profit for 1964 



51,527.06 



12,160.40 

1,445.56 

1,381.83 

3,308.21 

1,451.93 

31,665.91 

1,262.07 

3,647.62 

l6 r 03A.OO 

72,357.53 



Sales : 
Metered Sales 
Flat Rate Sales 
Sale of Supplies 
Rent from Water Meters 
Misc. Non Operating Income 
Total Sales 
Less Abatements 




124,692.80 

21,472.50 

4,860.57 

1,670.00 

1,025,00 
153,720.87 

1,212.40 



152,508.47 



F-43 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 31, 1964 



ASSETS 
Current Assets : 
Cash: 

Water Improvement 4,057.85 
Construction 38,879.55 

Surplus (Deficit) (27,379.42) 



Accounts Receivable 
Materials & Supplies 

Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets : 
Engineering 
Land 

New Well System 
Pumping Station 
Reservoirs & Standpipes 
Storage Basin 
Distribution Reservoir 
Bull Brook Reservoir 
Departmental Buildings 
Store House 
Pumps & Pumping Equip. 
Purification System 
Pipe Lines & Dist. Mains 
Service Pipes 
Meters 

Consumers Meters 
Hydrants 

Misc. Expenditures 
Office Equipment 
Shop Equipment 
Stores Equipment 
Transportation Equipment 
Misc. Equipment 
Total 

Less - Reserve for 
Depreciation 



15,557.98 
39,985.74 
30.775.88 
86,319.60 



44,017.06 

20,249.72 

129,004.72 

65,502.32 

378,183.14 

27,693.59 

17,827.56 

50,476.43 

2,367.97 

178.70 

66,909.42 

3,201.09 

767,779.50 

176,235.04 

38,465.06 

691.60 

9,767.43 

1,912.10 

1,833.45 

8,207.20 

68.26 

26,806.69 

8. 3 49.52 

1,845,727.57 

501.451.25 
1,344,276.32 



LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 
Liabilities : 
Town of Ipswich 

Contribution 
Electric Light 

Contribution 
Campanelli Contribution 
A.P.W. Contribution 
Bonds Payable 



Surplus : 
Profit & Loss 
Water Dept. Property 
Account 



24,083.03 

39,338.91 

23,000.00 

144,750.00 

ftLl.W.PP. 

842,671.94 



126,115.71 

A61,8Q8.27 
587,923.98 



Total Assets 



1,4?0.595.92 



1.430.595.93. 



F-44 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1964 



Expenses : 
Generating: 
Operation, Supervision and 

Engineering 8,542.20 

Fuel 199,455.94 

Generation Expense (Labor) 62,163.91 

Generation Expense (Lube) 7,632.88 

Misc. Other Generation Exp. 3,499.99 

Maint. Supervision & Eng. 7,816.38 

Maint. of Structure (Power) 8.75 
Maint. of Generator & Elec. 

Plant 21,150.80 
Maint. of Misc. in Gen. Pla nt 280.00 



Distribution: 
Overhead Line Expense 
Meter Expenses 
Misc. Dist. Expense 
Maint. Dist. Sta. Equip. 
Maint. Overhead Lines 
Maint. Str. Lighting & 
Signal System 



310,550.85 



2,610.13 

6,297.51 

7,487.90 

368.67 

62,422.77 

5 r 500. 54 
84,687.52 



Customer Accounts Expense: 
Customers Accts. Exp. Supv. 4,144.08 
Meter Reading Expense 7,125.60 
Customers Records & Coll. Ex p 7,965.75 

19,235.43 

Administration & General Expense: 

Adm. & General Salaries 14,675.00 

Office Supplies & Expenses 1,438.45 

Outside Service Employed 2,688.00 

Property Insurance (General) 285.60 

Property Insurance (Power.) 4,671.60 

Injuries & Damage (General) 1,437.12 

Injuries & Damage (Power) 335.48 

Employee Pension & Benefits 15,114.00 

Misc. General Expense 1,628.48 

Maint. General Plant 2,465.07 

Transportation 2,778.93 

Depreciation 73,216.00 

Interest on Bonds 11 f 416. 30 



Sales : 
Interest & Dividend Income 3,229.18 

Residential 350,348.57 

Commercial 123,790.57 

Industrial 141,397.29 

Street Lighting 10,332.00 
Lighting Municipal Bldgs. 23,778.86 

Sales for Resale 64,399.50 

Misc . Service Revenue 80.00 

Other Electric Revenue 3 f 597.45 

Total Sales 720,953.42 
Other Income 

Deducations 36.199.61 



132,150.03 



Total Expenses 
Profit for 1964 




684,753.81 



F^5 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



i<M 



3 2122 00161 557 8 



ASSETS 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

BALANCE SHEET 

DECEMBER 31, 1964 

LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



Current Assets ; 
Cash: 
Operating 
Construction 
Depreciation 
Other Spec. Deposit 

Accounts Receivable 
Inventory 

Fuel Oil 

Lubricants 

Materials & Suppl. 



60,351.29 

17,901.17 

105,160.71 

15,?10.?1 

198,723.48 
58,772.79 

13,237.44 
454.56 

12,118.71 

25,810.71 



Other Assets: 

Land & Land Rights 841.20 

Power Structures 103,674.95 
Fuel Holders Prod. & Access. 9,336.48 
Prime Movers 1,133,286.73 

Generators 35,766.78 

Accessory Elec. Equip. 24,727.92 

Misc. Power Plant Equip. 15,888.10 

Land & Land Rights 11,236.00 

Distribution Sta. Equip. 292,851.04 

Poles & Fixtures 221,028.13 

Overhead Conductors & Dev. 210,185.80 

Underground Conductors 13,903.11 

Line Transformers & Reg. 191,865.64 

Services 28,996.09 

Meters 87,636.04 
Install, on Customers 

Premises 1,291.48 
Street Lighting & Sig. Sys. 67,619.59 

General Structures 63,537.93 

Office Equipment 11,221.75 

Transportation Equipment 52,703.56 

Laboratory Equipment 2,394.49 

Communication Equipment Afl3A.87 



Less - Reserve for 
Depreciation 

Total Assets 



2,584,127.68 

915,869.3? 
1,668,258.33 



LjablliUes 
Bonds Payable 
Customers Deposits 
Interest Accrued 



Surplus ; 
Loans Repayment 
Contribution Aid of 

Construction 
Unappropriated Earned 

Surplus 



329,000.00 

10,423.47 

2,525,50 

341,948.97 



558,000.00 

1,511.06 

1.050.105,28 
1,609,616.34 



1,0^1^6^31 



1.951.555,31 



F-^6 



Cover photograph by Donna Harris. Other photographs 
by Elmer Cowperthwaite and the courtesy of the 
Beverly Times and Ipswich Chronicle. 



Printed in U.S.A. by 

BRADFORD & BIGELOW, INC. 

Salem, Massachusetts 



f^~\ 4***-^ 



THE TOWN OF IPSWICH AT YOUR SERVICE 



A handy Check-List and Directory of Often-Used Town Services 



Emergency - Fire 

356-4321 



POLICE 
356-4343 



AMBULANCE 
356-4343 



Administration, General 

Assessments 

Bicycle Licenses 

Bills and Accounts 

Birth Certificates 

Burial Permits 

Business Certificates 

Cemeteries 

Civil Defense 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Elections 

Electric 

Electric Light Bills 

Employment 

Engineering 

Entertainment Licenses 

Financial Data 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses 

Garbage Collection 

Health 

Home for Aged and Infirm 

Housing 

Highway 

Library 

Licenses (General) 

Lights, Street 

Maps 

Marriage Certificates 

Milk, Animal Inspection 

Mortgages, Personal Property 

Mortgages, Real Estate 

Oil Storage (Fuel) 

Parks 

Pensions 

Playgrounds 

Public Welfare 

Purchasing 

Recreation 

Retirement 

Rubbish Collection 

Schools 



Sewers 

Treatment Plant 

Veterans' Services 

Water 

Weights and Measures 



Executive Department 

Assessors 

Police 

Treasurer 

Town Clerk 

Health 

Town Clerk 

Cemetery Department 

Civil Defense 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk 

Electric Department 

Billing Department 

Executive Department 

Engineering Department 

Selectmen 

Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Health Department 

Health Department 

Welfare Department 

Housing Authority 

Highway Department 

Public Library 

Selectmen 

Electric Department 

Pumping Station 

Engineering Department 

Town Clerk 

Health Department 

Town Clerk 

Assessors 

Fire Department 

Recreation Division 

Treasurer 

Recreation Division 

Welfare Department 

Executive Department 

Recreation Department 

Treasurer 

Executive Department 

School Department (Supt. ) 

New High School 

Junior High School 

Burley School 

Shatswell School 

Winthrop School 

Health Department 

Sewer 

Veterans' Services Department 

Water Department 

Health Department 



HOSPITAL 
356-4366 
356-4848 
356-4010 
356-4343 
356-3100 
356-4161 
356-4900 
356-4161 
356-3933 
356-5333 
356-4161 
356-4161 
356-4161 
356-4331 
356-4830 
356-4848 
356-5433 
356-4848 
356-3066 
356-4161 
356-4900 
356-4900 
356-3464 
356-2035 
356-2411 
356-4646 
356-4848 
356-4331 
356-3600 
356-5433 
356-4161 
356-4900 
356-4161 
356-4010 
356-4322 
356-3767 
356-3100 
356-3767 
356-3464 
356-4848 
356-3767 
356-3100 
356-4848 
356-2935 
356-3137 
356-3535 
356-2666 
356-2312 
356-2976 
356-4900 
356-4685 
356-3915 
356-4331 
356-4900